How to Make Choux Pastry (Pâte à Choux)

Deliciously soft and creamy cream puffs with homemade light and airy choux pastry! Easy pate a choux recipe on sallysbakingaddiction.com

Today I’m teaching you how to make choux pastry (pâte à choux) with about 100 pictures to show you how it’s done. If you’re not digging all the step-by-step photos, video tutorial, and explanations, scroll down to the recipe to get started. 🙂

How to make light and airy choux pastry for cream puffs, eclairs, and profiteroles. Homemade pate a choux recipe on sallysbakingaddiction.com

Welcome to the September Baking Challenge! By popular request, we’re working on a French pastry dough this month: choux pastry, pronounced shoe pastry. Or, in French, pâte à choux. I learned how to make choux pastry in the French baking class I took earlier this summer. We spent an afternoon diving deep into this versatile classic and I’m sharing everything I learned with you today.

“Choux” means cabbage and pâte means paste. So, in other words, cabbage paste. Why is it called “cabbage paste” you ask? The name comes from the resemblance the pastry has to tiny cabbages. When baked, the pastry puffs up with little crinkles and ruffles– pictured above. Little cabbages! But instead of cabbage paste, let’s simply call it choux pastry.

Choux has the reputation for being difficult, but– as I witnessed with several other bakers in our French pastry class– it’s surprisingly simple. Master this easy recipe and you can make many pastries most bakers are scared to try. Pipe logs and fill with pastry cream for eclairs, pipe dollops and sandwich with whipped cream or ice cream for cream puffs and profiteroles, mix it with cheese and herbs for savory gougères, deep fry it for churros, French cruller donuts, choux beignets, the list goes on.

Choux pastry is a wonderful recipe for a monthly baking challenge because if you stick to the 1 basic recipe below, the door to DOZENS of other pastries is wide open.

Deliciously soft and creamy cream puffs with homemade light and airy choux pastry! Easy pate a choux recipe on sallysbakingaddiction.com

Ingredients for homemade choux pastry on sallysbakingaddiction.com

Today I’m showing you how to make sweet cream puffs and profiteroles. Later this week, I’ll show you how to make eclairs. (Update: here is the eclairs recipe!) Feel free to use this basic choux dough in any of the pastries listed above!

TWO SIMPLE RULES FOR CHOUX PASTRY

  1. stick to the ingredients and measurements
  2. don’t open the oven while it bakes

The 7 ingredients are staples that you likely have in the kitchen right now: butter, water, milk, sugar, salt, flour, and eggs. Some recipes use all water instead of milk + water, but I find the combination yields a slightly softer and richer pastry. Not many choux pastry recipes call for sugar, but only 2 teaspoons provide a little flavor. The bulk of the pastry dough is eggs. Eggs provide some leavening, allowing the pastries to puff up when baked. The centers are soft, light, and airy. The exterior is golden and crisp. A beautiful marriage of textures!!

How to make light and airy choux pastry for cream puffs, eclairs, and profiteroles. Homemade pate a choux recipe on sallysbakingaddiction.com

Choux pastry comes together in about 10-15 minutes. Most of the ingredients are cooked together on the stove; this initial cooking causes the starch in the flour to gelatinize, which will help the pastry hold onto steam and puff up. The Spruce Eats has an interesting article explaining the science of choux pastry if you’re into that!!

How to make light and airy choux pastry for cream puffs, eclairs, and profiteroles. Homemade pate a choux recipe on sallysbakingaddiction.com

After the choux pastry dough is gently cooked on the stove, transfer to a mixing bowl and add AROUND 4 beaten eggs. That’s the finicky part– the number of eggs in choux pastry isn’t really consistent between batches. Humidity, the exact size of egg, or an accidental extra 1/2 teaspoon of flour creates inconsistencies. 4 beaten eggs is an ideal starting point, though. Only add as much as you need to create a shiny, thick, and smooth dough with a pipeable consistency. I usually leave a few teaspoons of beaten egg behind, which can be used with the egg wash.

Beaten eggs for choux pastry on sallysbakingaddiction.com

The yolks in the eggs bring most of the flavor and color to choux pastry:

How to make light and airy choux pastry for cream puffs, eclairs, and profiteroles. Homemade pate a choux recipe on sallysbakingaddiction.com

How to make light and airy choux pastry for cream puffs, eclairs, and profiteroles. Homemade pate a choux recipe on sallysbakingaddiction.com

At this point, our choux pastry dough is complete! Yes, that’s really all you need to do before shaping/baking it. Cook 6 ingredients on the stove, then beat in the eggs.

Now let’s make our cream puffs or profiteroles.

CREAM PUFFS

Filled with flavored whipped creams. Today I’m using homemade vanilla whipped cream, aka Crème Chantilly. Top with a dusting of confectioners’ sugar or a spoonful of chocolate ganache.

PROFITEROLES

Filled with ice cream and frozen. Topped with chocolate ganache. Profiteroles were my FAVORITE!!! We used butter pecan ice cream and coffee ice cream.

Watch me make the choux pastry and shape/bake into cream puffs and profiteroles:

Do you have a better understanding of the process after watching the video tutorial? Not too scary at all, right? You totally got this!

Moisten the parchment paper when baking choux pastry. Recipe on sallysbakingaddiction.com

ONE TRICK I LEARNED

And it makes a huge difference in (1) how much the pastry puffs up and (2) how delicious the pastry tastes. Bake the pastries on parchment paper, the BEST nonstick surface for this choux pastry dough. But before you pipe the dough onto the parchment paper, moisten it with water. You can see me doing this in the video tutorial above.

Why? Think of cheesecake. We bake cheesecakes in a water bath, right? Cheesecake, like choux pastry, is egg-heavy. Eggs need a moist and humid environment in the oven to (1) properly rise and (2) avoid drying out and burning.

Water moistened parchment paper = perfectly puffed up pastries with a deliciously light center and crisp exterior. Pastry perfection.

How to pipe choux pastry on sallysbakingaddiction.com

For cream puffs and profiteroles, use Wilton 1A piping tip. Pipe 2-inch mounds about 3 inches apart. (Watch the video above for a good visual.) You could also use a zipped-top bag and cut off the corner for easy piping. Using a water moistened finger, smooth down the peaks and lightly brush each mound with egg wash.

How to make light and airy choux pastry for cream puffs, eclairs, and profiteroles. Homemade pate a choux recipe on sallysbakingaddiction.com

These mounds bake into this golden puffy pastry! 

Light and airy choux pastry recipe and video tutorial. The BEST homemade pate a choux recipe on sallysbakingaddiction.com

Homemade vanilla whipped cream on sallysbakingaddiction.com

Split open the baked and cooled pastries, then fill with homemade whipped cream, lemon curd, jam, pastry cream, a combination of these, or your favorite filling!! You can also poke a hole in the pastries and pipe the filling inside.

Check out these beautiful hollow pastries, thanks to the steam created from the moisture inside and outside the baking dough!

Light and airy cream puffs with homemade choux pastry and vanilla whipped cream! Easy pate a choux recipe on sallysbakingaddiction.com

Deliciously soft and creamy cream puffs with homemade light and airy choux pastry! Easy pate a choux recipe on sallysbakingaddiction.com

Deliciously soft and creamy cream puffs with homemade light and airy choux pastry! Easy pate a choux recipe on sallysbakingaddiction.com

And for profiteroles, ice cream with a generous shower of ganache. I teach you how to make these pictured cream puffs and profiteroles in the recipe notes below.

The BEST profiteroles with homemade choux pastry and decadent chocolate ganache. Fill the airy choux pastry shells with your favorite ice cream. Homemade pate a choux recipe on sallysbakingaddiction.com

The BEST profiteroles with homemade choux pastry and decadent chocolate ganache. Fill the airy choux pastry shells with your favorite ice cream. Homemade pate a choux recipe on sallysbakingaddiction.com

Join the September Baking Challenge

Make the choux pastry recipe below and turn it into your favorite pastry such as the cream puffs or profiteroles pictured today and detailed in the recipe notes. You can also use my choux pastry recipe below to make eclairs, churros, croquembouche, French cruller donuts, choux beignets, or gougères. Let your creativity shine this month because with the choux pastry recipe below, your possibilities are endless!

If you’re not into this recipe, here is the alternate September Baking Challenge:

After you make the pastry or alternate recipe, share your photos throughout September using #sallysbakingchallenge on your public Instagram or Twitter, or upload a photo of your recipe to my Facebook page or Facebook group. Or email it to me. By sharing or sending your photo, you’re automatically entered in the $250 giveaway!

Choux Pastry (Pâte à Choux)

Ingredients:

Choux Pastry

  • 1/2 cup (115g; 8 Tbsp) unsalted butter, cut into 8 pieces
  • 1/2 cup (120ml) water
  • 1/2 cup (120ml) 2% or whole milk
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 2 teaspoons granulated sugar
  • 1 cup (125g) all-purpose flour (spoon & leveled)
  • 4 large eggs, beaten
  • egg wash: 1 egg beaten with 1 Tablespoon milk or water

Equipment

Directions:

  1. Watch the video in the blog post above; it will help guide you through the next few steps.
  2. Make the choux pastry dough: Combine the butter, water, milk, salt, and granulated sugar together in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Stir until the butter has melted. Bring mixture to a simmer. Once simmering, reduce heat to low and add the flour all at once. Stir until the flour is completely incorporated and a thick dough clumps into a ball. Mash the dough ball against the bottom and sides of the pan for 1 minute, which gently cooks the flour. Remove from heat and transfer to the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with a paddle attachment or, if using a handheld mixer, a large mixing bowl. Allow to cool down for a few minutes before adding the eggs in the next step.
  3. Read this step in full before starting. With the mixer running on low speed, slowly add the eggs in 3-4 separate additions mixing for 30 seconds between each. The mixture will look curdled at first, but will begin to come together as the mixer runs. Pour in the final addition of beaten eggs very slowly. Stop adding when the choux pastry has reached the desired texture: shiny, thick, and smooth with a pipeable consistency. I usually leave a few teaspoons of beaten egg behind, which can be used with the egg wash.
  4. Your choux pastry dough is complete! You can use it immediately or cover and refrigerate for up to 3 days.
  5. For cream puff and profiterole shells: Preheat oven to 400°F (204°C). Line two baking sheets with parchment paper. Lightly brush the parchment with water, which creates a humid environment for the pastry shells allowing them to puff up without drying out or burning.
  6. Transfer choux pastry dough to a piping bag fitted with a Wilton 1A piping tip. Pipe 2-inch mounds about 3 inches apart. Watch the video in the blog post above for a visual. You can also use a zipped-top bag and cut off the corner for easy piping. Using a water moistened finger, smooth down the peaks and lightly brush each with egg wash.
  7. Bake for 20 minutes then, keeping the pastries in the oven, reduce oven to 350°F (177°C) and continue to bake for 10-15 more minutes until golden brown. Do not open the oven as the pastries cook, as cool air will prevent them from properly puffing up. Remove from the oven and transfer to a cooling rack. Allow to cool completely before filling.
  8. Split open pastries and fill with homemade whipped cream, lemon curd, pastry cream, jam, a combination of these, or your favorite filling. You can also poke a hole in the pastries and pipe the filling inside. For my pictured cream puffs and profiteroles, see recipe notes.
  9. Cover and store leftover filled pastries in the refrigerator for up to 3 days. Cover and store unfilled pastries at room temperature for 1 day, in the refrigerator for 5 days, or freeze for up to 3 months. Thaw in the refrigerator before filling and serving.

Make ahead tip: Prepare choux pastry dough through step 3. Cover and refrigerate for up to 3 days or freeze for up to 3 months. Thaw in the refrigerator before shaping and baking.

Recipe Notes:

  1. For the pictured cream puffs: Crack open each cooled pastry shell and generously spoon homemade vanilla whipped cream (Crème Chantilly) inside each. Top with a dusting of confectioners' sugar or drizzle of chocolate ganache (ganache instructions below). For the whipped cream, combine 2 cups (480ml) cold heavy cream, 3 Tablespoons granulated or confectioners' sugar, and 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract in a large bowl. Using a handheld or stand mixer fitted with a whisk attachment, beat on medium-high speed until soft peaks form, about 3 minutes.
  2. For the pictured profiteroles: Crack open each cooled pastry shell and fill with a scoop of your favorite ice cream. Freeze for 1 hour or up to 1 day. Top with chocolate ganache. For the chocolate ganache, finely chop two 4-ounce semi-sweet chocolate bars and place in a medium bowl. Heat 1 cup (240ml) heavy cream in a small saucepan until it begins to gently simmer. (Do not let it come to a rapid boil-- that's too hot!) Pour over chocolate and let it sit for 2-3 minutes to gently soften the chocolate. Slowly stir until completely combined and chocolate has melted. Allow to cool for 3 minutes before pouring over pastries.

Adapted from Baltimore Chef Shop, where I took my pastry class 🙂

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Deliciously soft and creamy cream puffs with homemade light and airy choux pastry and rich chocolate ganache! Easy pate a choux recipe on sallysbakingaddiction.com

SHOP THE RECIPE

Here are some items I used to make today’s recipe.

KitchenAid Stand Mixer | 5-qt Tilt-Head Glass Mixing Bowl | Glass Measuring Cup | Wooden Spoon | Copper Saucepan | Baking SheetWilton #1A Round Piping Tip | Piping Bags | Pastry Brush

Some of the links above are affiliate links, which pay me a small commission for my referral at no extra cost to you! Thank you for supporting Sally’s Baking Addiction.

84 Comments

Comments

  1. Denise on September 6, 2018 at 3:55 pm

    I started my choux pastry adventure last year. We made classic and banana. They were so good. And very easy. However… i would LOVE if you would share how to do the french cruellers! They are my all time favorite donut! I had no idea how many things you could make with this dough! So cool!

    • Sally on September 9, 2018 at 2:45 pm

      Isn’t it great? Choux is so so versatile! I’ll have to eventually try my hand at French crullers. Thank you for the suggestion!

  2. Evelyn B on September 6, 2018 at 11:37 pm

    Is it important to use 2% or whole milk? We normally keep 1% milk and fat-free Lactaid in the house, so I’m wondering if it would be ok to use one of those, and if I should alter anything with the recipe if I used milk or Lactaid with less or no fat. Thanks.

    • Sally on September 9, 2018 at 2:47 pm

      Hi Evelyn! Your best bet is to use all water instead of 1/2 cup water and 1/2 cup lactaid.

      • Evelyn B on September 9, 2018 at 10:17 pm

        Thanks, what about 1% milk? Would that work, or would it be better to use water in place of that as well?



      • Sally on September 10, 2018 at 9:58 am

        Hi Evelyn! 1% milk would be fine.



  3. Ashley on September 8, 2018 at 8:36 am

    We made these and they came out very good. I had my teens from church over and it was a blast making these. Next time I will make a little bigger. They came out smaller than expected.(my own fault)I should have baked them for less time . But overall very easy to make. Instead of ganache on top. The girls put it inside with their Ice cream. Thankyou for all the pictures and the video. They really helped us alot.

    • Sally on September 10, 2018 at 2:31 pm

      What a fun group activity! I’m glad you all had fun 🙂

  4. Michelle on September 8, 2018 at 4:43 pm

    Hi Sally! When making the profiteroles, do you out the ganache on right before eating? Or can I assemble them as a whole & freeze until ready to eat?

    • Sally on September 9, 2018 at 2:47 pm

      Hi Michelle! You can do it either way. I like serving them with warm ganache on the cold pastry/ice cream 🙂

      • Michelle on September 9, 2018 at 3:29 pm

        Thank you so much!!! Mine didn’t puff up as much, but they taste delish! I will try again next weekend!



  5. Tricia on September 9, 2018 at 2:34 am

    Hi, sally! I want to make these smaller, but idk how to adjust the time because there are two temperatures.

    Normally, i would time the eyeball the first batch, then adjust on the succeeding. But i’m not sure how to do that here. Help please? Thanks

    • Sally on September 9, 2018 at 2:34 pm

      Hi Tricia! I recommend about 5-10 minutes at 400F, then reduce to 350F and bake until you think they’re ready 🙂

  6. Naomi on September 9, 2018 at 11:31 am

    Incredible, in-depth recipe for a beginner like me! If anyone worries about the right consistency of the choux (like I did), I learned online that, if you put it between your thumb and forefinger and then pull the fingers apart, the bottom peak of choux should be limp and fall over. This was perfect for my eclairs!

    • Sally on September 9, 2018 at 2:28 pm

      I’m so glad to read this, thank you so much for reporting back about your experience with this choux pastry!

  7. Andrea on September 15, 2018 at 5:21 pm

    I just finished making these they were much better than my first attempt a year or two ago, but my husband mentioned that they tasted eggy. Is that just the nature of choux dough or do you think I added the eggs too early? Or too many? I intentionally let it cool before adding them and it did not look like the eggs cooked in the batter.

    Some of them ended up being beautiful, but I had a couple that ended up being quite flat. All in all, they were actually easy to make and your instructions were easy to follow! I will be exploring more with these soon like, maybe tomorrow!

    • Sally on September 17, 2018 at 11:31 am

      Hi Andrea! They naturally taste a little eggy. You didn’t add the eggs too early. How was the consistency? Very thin? If so, maybe there was too much egg. I’m so glad that you gave choux pastry another try!

  8. Holly Twospoons on September 16, 2018 at 5:06 pm

    How long will the baked choux pastry keep for at room temperature?

    I want to bake the eclairs today and full them tomorrow.

    • Sally on September 17, 2018 at 11:23 am

      Hi Holly! See the recipe instructions. 🙂 Cover and store leftover filled pastries in the refrigerator for up to 3 days. Cover and store unfilled pastries at room temperature for 1 day, in the refrigerator for 5 days, or freeze for up to 3 months. Thaw in the refrigerator before filling and serving.

Reviews

  1. Ashley on September 8, 2018 at 8:36 am

    We made these and they came out very good. I had my teens from church over and it was a blast making these. Next time I will make a little bigger. They came out smaller than expected.(my own fault)I should have baked them for less time . But overall very easy to make. Instead of ganache on top. The girls put it inside with their Ice cream. Thankyou for all the pictures and the video. They really helped us alot.

    • Sally on September 10, 2018 at 2:31 pm

      What a fun group activity! I’m glad you all had fun 🙂

  2. Naomi on September 9, 2018 at 11:31 am

    Incredible, in-depth recipe for a beginner like me! If anyone worries about the right consistency of the choux (like I did), I learned online that, if you put it between your thumb and forefinger and then pull the fingers apart, the bottom peak of choux should be limp and fall over. This was perfect for my eclairs!

    • Sally on September 9, 2018 at 2:28 pm

      I’m so glad to read this, thank you so much for reporting back about your experience with this choux pastry!

Questions

  1. Sonia on September 3, 2018 at 3:54 am

    Hi Sally! I love your recipes and photography but since I´m vegan, I always change certain ingredients. Can I also join the challenge if I veganize the recipe? Thank you!

    • Sally on September 3, 2018 at 8:14 am

      Yes, absolutely! Be sure to share details about your creation. I’d love to know how it goes!

    • Amber Simons on September 3, 2018 at 7:26 pm

      I would love to know how your vegan recipe turns out!

      • Sonia on September 12, 2018 at 8:57 am

        I haven´t made it yet because I´ve family visiting and I almost have no time to cook, but I´m so excited to give it a try! 🙂



  2. Elsa on September 3, 2018 at 7:53 am

    Could you develop a good recipe for gluten free choux pastry?

    • Sally on September 3, 2018 at 8:16 am

      Hi Elsa! I’m not very experienced with GF baking, so I’m not the best source. Let me know if you find a great recipe for GF choux just in case other readers are interested!

      • Kay Williams on September 4, 2018 at 12:38 am

        Yes would love to have GF for choux if anyone can find right substitute



    • stephanie on September 4, 2018 at 7:20 pm

      I would check King Arthur Flour, they might have a recipe. Also, just try using your favorite GF flour blend.

    • Dani on September 6, 2018 at 1:58 pm

      King Arthur Flour mentions just substituting 1.25 cups/5.25 ounces of their Gluten-Free Measure for Measure Flour. “The gluten-free shells will be every bit as crisp and high-rising as the all-purpose flour version.”

      https://blog.kingarthurflour.com/2018/06/12/pate-a-choux-perfected/

  3. Jan on September 3, 2018 at 8:39 am

    I’ve been wanting to try these for a long time. You’re step by step photos and video have given me confidence. I also appreciate the “tips”. Just wondering, could these be made about half the size without loosing their integrity and then filled with a savory filling like a smoked salmon, ham, cheese or vegetable herb spread? Or would I need to find a choux recipe that does not include sugar?

    • Sally on September 3, 2018 at 10:09 am

      Hi Jan! Choux pastry is surprisingly forgiving when it comes to sizing, so feel free to shape the pastries smaller. You can leave out the sugar if you’d like. They’re not sweet at all even with the sugar– it just adds a little flavor.

  4. Kris on September 3, 2018 at 9:06 am

    Hi! Will these get soggy if I fill and leave in the cooler for a while? Or do they have to be filled before eating? Would painting inside with chocolate on the bottom help?

    • Sally on September 3, 2018 at 10:07 am

      Hi Kris! They’ll get soggy if left out for too long. My suggestion: Cover and store unfilled pastries at room temperature for 1 day, in the refrigerator for 5 days, or freeze for up to 3 months. Thaw in the refrigerator before filling and serving.

      Painting with chocolate inside would be a wonderful way to keep them fresh, too!

      • Kris on September 3, 2018 at 10:22 am

        Thank you so much, didn’t expect an answer so quickly…especially on a holiday! Hope you have a wonderful day!



  5. Julian on September 3, 2018 at 11:43 am

    You list 1/2 cup water and 1/2 cup milk. This cuts the milk. Could you just use 1 cup skim milk from powder instead?

    • Sally on September 3, 2018 at 1:08 pm

      There’s still some fat in the whole milk, providing some richness and flavor. Keeping that in mind, you can switch to 1 cup fat free milk (made from a powder or not) or 1 cup water.

  6. Kyuanna on September 3, 2018 at 12:07 pm

    I’m so happy about this recipe as I just had a craving for cream puffs! If I don’t have a stand mixer, are there alternative options?

    • Sally on September 3, 2018 at 1:04 pm

      A hand mixer works too, or some arm muscle and a wooden spoon or rubber spatula 🙂

      • Kyuanna on September 3, 2018 at 2:47 pm

        Thanks so much! can’t wait to give this challenge a go! One follow up question, for the hand mixer, would you suggest using both beaters or a single one?



      • Sally on September 4, 2018 at 10:21 am

        You can use both.



  7. Rena on September 3, 2018 at 4:07 pm

    Hi Sally! I was wondering how much pastry cream I would need to fill the cream puffs. I wasn’t sure if it was the single batch from your Boston cream pie recipe or not.

  8. Meg on September 3, 2018 at 5:16 pm

    Sally, in the question about ‘painting w chocolate ‘ that would keep the pastry fresh. I’m curious to find out how that works and what type of chocolate would i use?
    Thank you, (I can’t wait to try the recipe)

    • Sally on September 4, 2018 at 10:21 am

      Hi Meg! I personally have not tried it, but this is what I would do: melt pure chocolate baking bars (like Bakers or Ghirardelli brand you find in the baking aisle) then use a pastry brush to coat the insides with melted chocolate. Refrigerate to harden the chocolate, then fill with pastry cream or whipped cream. YUM! A delicious chocolate shell inside the pastry. Again, I have not tried this yet.

  9. Vanessa on September 3, 2018 at 8:37 pm

    Hi Sally!
    Any tips for those who live at high altitudes? My cousin is dying to make them after she saw my pictures of the final product.
    Thanks

  10. Neesa on September 3, 2018 at 10:35 pm

    Alright! So I was waiting patiently for this recipe to come online today. Tried it as soon as I could. Probably my oven runs hot so the initial 20 mins should have been 15ish for me. For taste – 10/10!! Felt really proud of myself! Will be sending you a beautiful picture soon!

    One question though: the puffs didn’t rise as much as yours? Was I supposed to cook the dough a little longer? Or did I cook it for too long that’s why not a tall high rise? Did I beat the dough for too long (using hand held mixer)? Or I should have pipped them taller? Any thoughts? I’m just trying to perfect the technique…

    Overall a great hit! Thank you!

    • Sally on September 4, 2018 at 10:23 am

      Hi Neesa! Thank you so much for trying the recipe already! I’m so so so happy you’re happy with the taste. The pastries not puffing up as much could really be a multitude of things from baking too long to not cooking the 6 ingredients on the stove long enough to overmixing. Piping the mounds higher would definitely help give them a little lift next time though.

  11. Lauren on September 4, 2018 at 8:57 pm

    Hi Sally! I have just discovered your website and started with the choc chip cookie cake slightly after the August challenge but love it! I tried the choux yesterday but though it all looked perfect, it turned golden brown in the oven quicker than I thought – within about 10 minutes. I didn’t open the oven but let it keep going. By the time I got to the reduce temperature and keep them in for another 15, they were quite dark so I think it was a bit of a fail! Not sure where I went wrong, any ideas? I halved the recipe but it made more than 6 so I’m wondering if I didn’t pipe enough of the mixture so it just cooked quicker. I also live outside the US and use celsius and have a fan forced oven- should I be reducing the temperature more than what you’ve put in your recipes as it doesn’t specify fan forced – should I be lowering the temperature for each of your recipes by 20 C?

    • Sally on September 5, 2018 at 11:01 am

      Hi Lauren! Thank you so much for joining the challenges on my website!! For the choux pastry– your pastries could have been smaller, which is why they browned quicker. For a fan-forced oven, I always recommend reducing the oven temperature by 25 degrees F. How did they end up tasting?

      • Lauren on September 6, 2018 at 2:34 am

        I made a second batch and they’re perfect! Thanks for responding 🙂



  12. Wendy McMurray on September 5, 2018 at 1:21 pm

    Can I use a Wilton 172 tip instead?

    • Sally on September 9, 2018 at 2:42 pm

      Hi Wendy! That size should be just fine.

  13. Rena on September 6, 2018 at 11:27 am

    Hi Sally! When I tried making these, the dough was fine until I began to add the eggs-the dough became to runny. I made a second batch with only two eggs, and the same problem happened. I tried baking them and they burned very quickly. Any ideas as to why this is happening? Thanks

    • Sally on September 9, 2018 at 2:46 pm

      Hi Rena! I’m sorry you’re having trouble with the choux pastry. Are you using 1 cup of liquid total? And following the other measurements as well? Try cooking the dough for a little longer on the stove next time and let it cool down for 5 extra minutes before adding the beaten eggs.

  14. Evelyn B on September 6, 2018 at 11:37 pm

    Is it important to use 2% or whole milk? We normally keep 1% milk and fat-free Lactaid in the house, so I’m wondering if it would be ok to use one of those, and if I should alter anything with the recipe if I used milk or Lactaid with less or no fat. Thanks.

    • Sally on September 9, 2018 at 2:47 pm

      Hi Evelyn! Your best bet is to use all water instead of 1/2 cup water and 1/2 cup lactaid.

      • Evelyn B on September 9, 2018 at 10:17 pm

        Thanks, what about 1% milk? Would that work, or would it be better to use water in place of that as well?



      • Sally on September 10, 2018 at 9:58 am

        Hi Evelyn! 1% milk would be fine.



  15. Michelle on September 8, 2018 at 4:43 pm

    Hi Sally! When making the profiteroles, do you out the ganache on right before eating? Or can I assemble them as a whole & freeze until ready to eat?

    • Sally on September 9, 2018 at 2:47 pm

      Hi Michelle! You can do it either way. I like serving them with warm ganache on the cold pastry/ice cream 🙂

      • Michelle on September 9, 2018 at 3:29 pm

        Thank you so much!!! Mine didn’t puff up as much, but they taste delish! I will try again next weekend!



  16. Tricia on September 9, 2018 at 2:34 am

    Hi, sally! I want to make these smaller, but idk how to adjust the time because there are two temperatures.

    Normally, i would time the eyeball the first batch, then adjust on the succeeding. But i’m not sure how to do that here. Help please? Thanks

    • Sally on September 9, 2018 at 2:34 pm

      Hi Tricia! I recommend about 5-10 minutes at 400F, then reduce to 350F and bake until you think they’re ready 🙂

  17. Holly Twospoons on September 16, 2018 at 5:06 pm

    How long will the baked choux pastry keep for at room temperature?

    I want to bake the eclairs today and full them tomorrow.

    • Sally on September 17, 2018 at 11:23 am

      Hi Holly! See the recipe instructions. 🙂 Cover and store leftover filled pastries in the refrigerator for up to 3 days. Cover and store unfilled pastries at room temperature for 1 day, in the refrigerator for 5 days, or freeze for up to 3 months. Thaw in the refrigerator before filling and serving.

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