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Here’s how to make authentic-tasting Chicago deep dish pizza. Complete with the buttery crust, slightly sweet tomato sauce, and a thick layer of cheese. 

This recipe is brought to you in partnership with Red Star Yeast.

slice of deep dish pizza on a white plate

Warning: this post has about 1,000,000 step-by-step photos and lots of little explanations to go along with them. Might want to grab some coffee.

I recently looked at my website’s stats and came to find out that Chicago is my most popular city in the US. I have more Chicago readers than any other place in this country. That’s crazy awesome because I love Chicago. As a little tribute to my #1 city, I’m finishing one blow-out year with a Chicago inspired recipe.

I’ve only had the pleasure of having real, authentic Chicago-style pizza a few times. And those few times have been enough to convince me that Chicago-style pizza is incomparably good. Better than good.

deep dish pizza in a baking pan

So, what makes Chicago-style pizza so damn amazing? The answer is everything. Every little detail about this pizza is special. First, this pizza clearly doesn’t look like a pizza you are used to. It’s baked in a deep dish cake pan. The cheese goes directly on top of the crust and the sauce is piled on top. An upside-down pizza pie of sorts. Now, I may be completely wrong, but I’ve learned that the proper way to eat Chicago-style pizza is with a fork. Is this right, Chicago readers? I hope so because it’s the only way I can eat it without making an atrocious and very embarrassing mess.

Let’s talk about all the wonderful layers in this pizza.

The deep dish pizza crust. A crunchy-edged, flaky crust is key in Chicago-style pizza. It’s absolutely not a regular pizza crust. No, this crust is unique. And that’s why I steered completely away from my regular pizza crust recipe and dove headfirst into something completely nuts. Adding a little cornmeal. Cornmeal is what makes the crust so crunchy and flavorful. Not to mention, tasting like you’re eating the real deal.

deep dish pizza in a baking pan before baking

What else is special about this pizza crust? It’s so buttery. The butteriest pizza crust on the planet, or at least the butteriest pizza crust I’ve ever had the pleasure of tasting. To get that ultra buttery flavor, as well as the iconic flaky texture of Chicago-style pizza crust, we’re going to laminate the pizza dough. Umm, what?? Yes. It sounds weird, I know. But laminating dough is exactly what gives croissants its flaky layers. Laminating, or layering, butter into dough is the answer an authentic tasting Chicago pizza crust.

This all sounds hard, doesn’t it? Good news, it’s not! Laminating is literally just spreading butter on your pizza dough and folding it up. Then, rolling the pizza dough out again locking that butter inside. Easy.

I’m not sure how and I’m not sure why… but despite being a little crunchy and very flaky, this pizza crust will absolutely melt in your mouth. It’s crunchy, buttery, and tender all at the same time? A miracle crust.

Baking with Yeast Guide

Reference this Baking with Yeast Guide whenever you work with baker’s yeast. I include practical answers to all of your common yeast questions!
slice of deep dish pizza on a white plate with a fork

Let’s talk about the pizza sauce. Slightly sweet, incredibly thick, and wonderfully flavorful. The sauce is always my favorite part about Chicago-style pizza. In fact, I usually order extra sauce on the side. All about the condiments in my world.

This garlic infused pizza sauce is made on the stovetop and, while waiting for the pizza dough to rise, simmers quietly allowing the flavors to develop and the texture to thicken. I like to add some red pepper flakes for a little heat; it really gives this sauce something extra. If you don’t like heat, you can leave it out. This sauce is unlike ANY other tomato sauce I’ve ever had. To me, it tastes like the kinds I’ve had in Chicago. You’re going to love it. Unless of course you don’t like tomato sauce.

Along with the miracle crust and this luscious pizza sauce, a whole lotta cheese goes into this deep dish pie. You may use sliced mozzarella or shredded. Whatever it is, slice or shred it yourself from a block of real mozzarella cheese. Pre-shredded mozzarella is just fine, but the taste of sliced or shredded fresh mozzarella is just unbeatable.

My husband loves a good pepperoni pizza and bacon is his favorite food, so I add both to my Chicago-style pizza. These go on top of the cheese and before the sauce. A little grated parmesan to finish things up and we’ve got ourselves one damn tasty copycat Chicago deep dish pizza. How many times can I type Chicago in one post?

I love you Chicago and your pizza too!

deep dish pizza in a baking pan

This recipe makes 2 deep dish pizzas. They are small 9 inch pizzas. Kevin and I finished one by ourselves. Make them both if you have a family of 4-5 or are having friends over. If your family is smaller, freeze half of the dough per the make-ahead/freezing instructions in the recipe notes. Please use my step-by-step photos below this written out recipe as a guide to making the pizza. For best results and ease of mind (!!!), please read through the recipe completely before beginning.

Follow me on Instagram and tag #sallysbakingaddiction so I can see all the SBA recipes you make. 

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slice of deep dish pizza on a white plate

How To Make Chicago-Style Deep Dish Pizza

  • Author: Sally
  • Prep Time: 4 hours
  • Cook Time: 30 minutes
  • Total Time: 4 hours, 30 minutes
  • Yield: 2 deep dish 9-inch pizzas 1x
  • Category: Dinner
  • Method: Baking
  • Cuisine: American

Description

Here’s how to make authentic-tasting Chicago deep dish pizza. Complete with the buttery crust, slightly sweet tomato sauce, and a thick layer of cheese. This recipe makes two deep dish 9-inch pizzas. Make them both if you have a family of 4-5 or are having friends over. If your family is smaller, freeze half of the dough per the make-ahead/freezing instructions in the recipe notes.


Ingredients

Scale

Pizza Crust (makes 2)

  • 3 and 1/4 cups (406g) all-purpose flour (spoon & leveled)
  • 1/2 cup (60g) yellow cornmeal
  • 1 and 1/4 teaspoons salt
  • 1 Tablespoon (12g) granulated sugar
  • 2 and 1/4 teaspoons (7g) Platinum Yeast from Red Star instant yeast (1 standard packet)*
  • 1 and 1/4 cups (300ml) slightly warm water
  • 1/2 cup (115g) unsalted butter, divided (1/4 cup melted, 1/4 cup softened to room temperature)
  • olive oil for coating

Tomato Sauce for Both Pizzas

  • 2 Tablespoons (30g) unsalted butter
  • 1 small onion, grated (about 1/3 cup)*
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes (optional, but recommended)
  • 3 garlic cloves, minced
  • one 28-ounce can (794g) crushed tomatoes*
  • 1/4 teaspoon granulated sugar

Toppings for Both Pizzas

  • 4 cups (about 16 oz) shredded mozzarella cheese*
  • 1/2 cup (45g) grated parmesan cheese
  • optional and what I use: handful of pepperoni per pizza, 4 slices cooked and then crumbled bacon (2 per pizza)
  • additional optional toppings: cooked and crumbled sausage, thinly sliced green peppers and/or onions, sliced mushrooms (add enough to suit your tastes)

Instructions

  1. Please use my step-by-step photos below this written out recipe as a guide to making the pizza. For best results and ease of mind, read through the recipe completely before beginning. You will need two deep dish 9×2 inch round cake pans if you are making both pizzas at the same time. You can also use 9 inch springform pans.
  2. For the crust: Combine the flour, cornmeal, salt, sugar, and yeast in the bowl of your stand mixer fitted with a dough hook attachment. If you do not have a stand mixer, use your hand mixer and a very very large bowl. If you do not have any mixer, you will do this all by hand. Again, use a very large bowl. Give those ingredients a quick toss with your mixer on low or with a large wooden spoon. Add the warm water and 1/4 cup of melted butter. The warm water should be around 90°F (32°C). Make sure it is not very, very hot or it will kill the yeast. Likewise, make sure the butter isn’t boiling hot. If you melt it in the microwave, let it sit for 5 minutes before adding. On low speed, beat (or stir) the dough ingredients until everything begins to be moistened. Continuing on low speed (or remove from the bowl and knead by hand if you do not own a mixer), beat the dough until it is soft and supple and gently pulls away from the sides of the bowl and falls off of the dough hook- about 4-5 minutes. If the dough is too hard (it will be textured from the cornmeal), but if it feels too tough, beat in 1 teaspoon of warm water. Alternatively, if it feels too soft, beat in 1 Tablespoon of flour.
  3. Remove the dough from the bowl and form into a ball. Lightly grease a large mixing bowl with olive oil and place the dough inside, turning it around so that all sides of the dough are coated in the oil. Cover the bowl tightly with aluminum foil and allow to rise in a warm environment for 1-2 hours or until double in size.
  4. Once the dough is ready, lightly flour a large work surface. Remove dough from the bowl, set the bowl and aluminum foil aside (to use later). Gently punch down the dough to remove any air bubbles and roll the dough into a large 15×12 inch rectangle. Spread 1/4 cup of softened butter on top of the dough. Roll it up lengthwise per the photos below. Cut the dough log in half. Form the two pieces of dough into balls and place back into your greased bowl. Cover with aluminum foil and allow to rise in the refrigerator (not in a warm place) for 1 hour until they are puffy as you make the sauce.
  5. For the sauce: Place butter in a medium saucepan over medium heat and allow it to melt. Once melted, add the grated onion, salt, oregano, and red pepper flakes. Once the onion has slightly browned after about 5 minutes, add the garlic, tomatoes, and sugar. Turn the heat down to low-medium and allow it to simmer until it’s hearty, fragrant, and thick- about 30 minutes. You’ll have about 2 and 1/2 cups of sauce at this point. If you have more than that, keep simmering until the amount has reduced. Remove from heat and set aside until ready to be used. You may store the sauce in a tightly covered container in the refrigerator for up to 2 days if planning to make the pizza another day. You may freeze this sauce for up to 2 months as well.
  6. Preheat oven to 425°F (218°C).
  7. Assemble the pizzas: After the dough balls have risen in the refrigerator, they should be puffy. Keep one ball of dough in the refrigerator as you work with the first one. Roll it out on a lightly floured work surface, working it into a 12-inch circle. Using your rolling pin as a guide (see photos below), place over a 9×2 inch deep dish cake pan. Using your fingers, press the dough into the cake pan. Make sure it is nice and tight fitting inside the pan. Trim any excess dough off the edges with a small knife. Repeat with 2nd dough. Brush the top edges of the dough with a little olive oil, which gives the crust a beautiful sheen. Fill each pizza with 1/2 of the cheese (about 2 cups/8 oz per pizza), then your toppings which I’ve listed as optional in the recipe ingredients. On top of those optional toppings is the sauce. Pour about 1 and 1/4 cups (300ml) of sauce on top of each. If you do not like that much sauce, you can reduce to 3/4 cup (180ml) per pizza and have leftover sauce. Sprinkle each with 1/4 cup (22g) of grated parmesan cheese.
  8. Place the cake pans on top of a large baking sheet, which will catch anything potentially spilling over the sides of the pans. (Nothing usually does.) Bake for 20-28 minutes or until the crust is golden brown. Feel free to loosely cover the pizzas with aluminum foil after the 15 minute mark to prevent any heavy browning and uneven baking. Remove the pizzas from the oven and allow to cool in the pans placed on a wire rack for 10 minutes. After 10 minutes, slice, serve, and enjoy. Place any leftover pizza in an airtight container and refrigerate for up to 5 days.  Reheat leftovers in a 300°F (149°C) oven for 15-20 minutes or until hot.

Notes

  1. Make Ahead & Freezing Instructions: Dough may be prepared through step 4. In the last part of this step, the dough needs to rise in the refrigerator for 1 hour. You may leave it in the refrigerator for up to 1 full day, making sure to punch it down to remove any air bubbles before rolling out as directed in step 7. You may freeze the pizza doughs after preparing them through step 4, and instead of allowing to rise in the refrigerator, simply freeze for up to 2 months. Then, allow the doughs to thaw overnight in the refrigerator and allow to rise at room temperature for 1 hour before continuing with step 7. Make-ahead and freezing instructions for the sauce are written in step 5.
  2. Yeast: Platinum Yeast from Red Star is an instant yeast. You can use any quick rise or instant yeast in this recipe. You can also use active dry yeast in this recipe with zero changes. The rise time may be slightly longer if using active dry yeast.
  3. Onion & Tomatoes: Please see notes below the recipe in the step-by-step photos for details about the grated onion and the can of crushed tomatoes.
  4. Cheese: You can use sliced mozzarella or shredded mozzarella cheese.
  5. Reference my Baking with Yeast Guide for answers to common yeast FAQs.
  6. Adapted from: a mix of Food.com and Cooks Illustrated

Keywords: deep dish pizza, chicago style deep dish pizza

Begin by combining the flour, cornmeal, salt, sugar, and yeast in the bowl of your stand mixer fitted with a dough hook attachment. If you do not have a stand mixer, use your hand mixer and a very very large bowl. If you do not have any mixer, you will do this all by hand. Use a very large bowl.

I always use Red Star yeast. I use it for all of my yeast doughs including cinnamon rolls, breads, pizzas, etc. Their platinum line is my variety of choice.

deep dish pizza dough ingredients in a stand mixer bowl

Give those ingredients a quick toss with your mixer on low or with a large wooden spoon.

Per the recipe instructions above, add 1 and 1/4 cups of warm water and 1/4 cup of melted butter. The warm water should be around 90 degrees. Make sure it is not very, very hot or it will kill the yeast. Likewise, make sure the butter isn’t boiling hot. If you melt it in the microwave, let it sit for 5 minutes before adding.

pizza dough in a stand mixer bowl with dough hook

On low speed, beat (or stir) the dough ingredients until everything begins to be moistened.

Continuing on low speed (or kneading by hand), beat the dough until it is soft and supple and gently pulls away from the sides of the bowl and falls off of the dough hook. If the dough is too hard (it will be textured from the cornmeal), but if it feels too tough, beat in a teaspoon of warm water. Alternatively, if it feels too soft, beat in a Tablespoon of flour.

pizza dough on a dough hook

Remove the dough from the bowl and form into a ball. Lightly grease a large mixing bowl and place the dough inside, turning it around so that all sides of the dough are coated in the oil. Cover the bowl tightly with aluminum foil and allow to rise in a warm environment. For this warm environment, here is what I do (see the right photo below):

Preheat oven to 250F degrees. Once 250F degrees, turn oven off. Place bowl inside. Close the oven. The lingering heat will help your dough rise. This is especially ideal on cold winter days!

2 images of pizza dough in a red bowl and pizza dough in a bowl covered with foil rising in the oven

After 1-2 hours, the dough will have doubled in size. Gently punch it down.

pizza dough in a red bowl after rising

Lightly flour a large work surface.

ball of deep dish pizza dough

Remove dough from the bowl, set the bowl aside (to use later) and roll the dough into a large 15×12 rectangle. It does not have to be a perfect rectangle as you can see from my obscure looking shaped dough. As long as the measurements are right.

rolled out deep dish pizza dough

Per the written recipe above, spread 1/4 cup of softened butter on top.

deep dish pizza dough rolled out with butter spread on top

Roll it up the opposite way you roll cinnamon rolls. With cinnamon rolls, you always roll the longest side. Here we are rolling the shortest side:

2 images of rolling and folding deep dish pizza dough

Cut the dough log in half. See all those layers? That is what will make our pizza crust so incredibly flaky!

hand holding deep dish pizza dough showing the layers

Form these two pieces of dough into balls.

2 balls of deep dish pizza dough

Place back into your greased bowl. Cover with aluminum foil and allow to rise in the refrigerator (not in a warm place) for 1 hour as you make the sauce.

2 balls of deep dish pizza dough in a red bowl

Let’s begin the tomato sauce.

onion on a cutting board with a grater

1 very small onion, grated. Why grated? Grated onion lets off SO much moisture. Much more than simply dicing or chopping the onion. You want that moisture in your sauce, trust me. Grate the onion and use about 1/3 cup of it. If your onion yield more than this amount, save the rest for a different recipe. Or just grate the onion until you have 1/3 cup.

Easy.

Over medium heat, melt 2 Tablespoons of butter and then add the grated onion, the oregano, salt, and red pepper flakes. Once the onion has slightly browned, add the garlic, tomatoes, and sugar.

2 images of sautéed onions, spices, and butter in a saucepan on the stove and garlic cloves on a cutting board

Here is a 28-ounce can of crushed tomatoes. I use a kind that has basil flavor added. You can certainly use a can of plain crushed tomatoes. If using that, make sure to add 1 – 2 Tablespoons of chopped fresh basil (or about 1/2 teaspoon of ground dried basil) when you add the tomatoes.

can of Hunt's crushed tomatoes

Let it simmer until it is hearty, fragrant, and thick. About 30 minutes. You’ll have about 2 and 1/2 cups of sauce at this point. If you have more than that, keep simmering until the amount has reduced.

2 images of pizza sauce in a saucepan on the stove with a wood spoon

Dough balls have risen in the refrigerator, let’s roll them out one at a time. Keep the 2nd one in the refrigerator as you roll the first. The dough should be puffy, buttery, and smooth.

pizza dough with a wood rolling pin

Roll the dough ball out into a 12-inch circle. Using your rolling pin as a guide, place over a 9×2 inch cake pan. Like this:

pizza dough rolled out with a wood rolling pin

And then this:

pizza dough placed in a baking pan

Using your fingers, press the dough into the cake pan. Trim any excess dough off the edges. I like to brush the top edges with a little olive oil, which gives the exposed crust a little sheen when baked. After that, fill with 1/2 of the cheese (about 2 cups).

deep dish pizza dough in a pan with layer of cheese on the crust

Then, top with your toppings of choice. As mentioned in the written recipe above, we use pepperoni and bacon. Diet food, really.

Top with 1/2 of the tomato sauce (about 1 and 1/4 cups– see written out recipe if you want to use less) and then 1/2 of the parmesan cheese (about 1/4 cup per pizza). Repeat these last couple of steps with the second pizza.

Bake pizzas in a preheated 425F degree oven. Make sure that the oven is fully preheated and incredibly hot. Also, make sure you place the pans on top a baking sheet. Just in case anything spills over.

2 images of deep dish pizza with pepperoni and deep dish pizza toppings covered with sauce before baking

Crust is golden, pizzas look great.

deep dish pizza in a baking pan after baking

Slice and serve and ENJOY.

Reader Questions and Reviews

  1. Excellent recipe! The sauce was our favorite part. Came together so we’ll, we think it’s the closest we can get to the real thing.

    1. Wow my favorite the sauce makes the pizza. Cook mine I a springform pan. So good

  2. Fantastic pizza! I made this more or less to recipe, but I ended up browning some Italian sausage, draining it, and adding it to the sauce. I then reduced it enough to keep it from getting soupy (I lived in Illinois and find soupy deep dish offensive). I followed the crust to recipe, but I changed the cook time and temperature to 30 mins at 400°. It came out better than I ever had when I lived in the state this came from! I was able to both cut and pick up a slice to take a bite from. Of course, toppings that deep will always slide off, so a fork for the dropped bits are necessary.
    Wonderful recipe! I really appreciate what you’re sharing here. It’s nice to be able to show people that Chicago deep dish doesn’t have to be a gross, soupy mess.
    Thanks so much!

  3. Hello, just a quick question. No red star yeast where I live. I have fleischmans though. Would I use the instant one or the pizza one? Tha is in advance.

    1. Hi Jeff, We use instant yeast (Fleischmann’s yeast is a great option). You can however use any quick rise or instant yeast in this recipe. See the recipe notes for details.

  4. Excellent pizza. Can I bake the whole pizza and refrigerate for 2 days before eating?

    1. Hi Jen, pizza will stay good in the refrigerator for up to five days. You can reheat leftovers (or the entire pizza, if already baked) in a 300°F (149°C) oven for 15-20 minutes or until hot.

  5. Can I assemble this pizza ahead, freeze, thaw, and bake a week later for guests? I don’t like being rushed cooking and cleaning when I’m entertaining.

    1. Hi Jill, see recipe notes for our recommend make-ahead instructions! If the pizza is frozen assembled, it may grow soggy when baked.

  6. Hi Sally! If I want to make this recipe but want to make a crust without butter, would you recommend just using a regular pizza crust recipe instead, or do you think it would work to use this recipe and just sub oil (maybe less oil) for the butter? Basically since this is pretty similar to your regular pizza dough other than the butter and cornmeal, what I’m asking is if the cornmeal+butter interacts together somehow in a way that would flop if I tried subbing oil.

    1. Hi Avra, I recommend just using the regular pizza dough recipe instead. Feel free to add a couple Tablespoons of cornmeal to that dough.

  7. This was incredible! The sauce was great – this is a keeper for sure 🙂

  8. Hello. I have a 12 inch deep dish pizza pan. Can I just use the entire dough for this size?

  9. I have made this 4 times now. Great flavor, the side crust is crispy, but the bottom crust is soggy. Should I try putting the pizza pan on a preheated baking stone?

    1. Yes, that would absolutely help the bottom crust cook a little more. Let us know how it turns out.

  10. This was my first, and most definitely not last, attempt at a deep dish pizza. Thank you for the awesome directions, pictures, and ideas.

    1. Hi Sharon, You can use a seasoned 9 inch cast iron skillet for just one pizza (the recipe makes two, so make one at a time or you would need two 9 inch skillets for both). Other readers have reported success using larger size skillets for one larger pizza but we’re unsure of the bake time needed for that. Let us know what you try!

      1. They turned out great. Very tasty. I’d love to be able to send you a picture lol. I did have two 9 inch cast iron skillets and they worked well. I would have preferred a crisper bottom crust, but I’ve done some research and have ideas on how to achieve that next time. There will definitely be a next time!

    1. Hi Sara! You could try it but your crust will be a little chewier rather than have that iconic crunchy flaky texture of Chicago style pizza.

  11. I made this a few weeks ago exactly as written. Came out pretty awesome for a first run.
    Making again today.
    Trying with just a little more sugar ( 1/2 more ). And added a little extra corn meal.
    We will see how it goes. But you showed me well. Thanks.
    This is about as close to pizziria uno. I need to make the sauce a little more ‘wet’. Last time it was too dry and kind of made the whole pies dry. I like a little moist on the tomatoe sauce. I think.

  12. I’ve made this few times and definitely will make it again and again. It was easy, flaky and oh so delicious. Oh yea since I’m lazy I just use the Rao’s marinara and it still turned out well.

  13. This was the first non-dessert recipe I’ve made from this site, and it turned out fantastic! I made both pizzas with my springform pan, one meat lovers and one Italian, and broth turned out delicious.

  14. Excellent! This is the first pizza I’ve made… Since there are good pizzerias close to home I’ve never bothered… But we were craving Chicago style deep dish and that is impossible to get here. I was afraid because I’m no expert cook or baker, but it was easy and worked out perfectly… We were 7 and only 3 of us had tried deep dish before, everyone loved it, must had seconds!

    1. I made this recipe a few months ago and I was amazed at how authentic it was. Just what I was hankering for. The only small issue I had was the bottom crust was just a little soggy. Any idea’s besides baking it on a pizza stone? I will definitely keep making this for my family. It was a big hit

  15. I made this recipe twice and I’m from Chicago. It came out really well. I used a 13” cast iron seasoned skillet and placed it on top of a cooking stone. It make out perfectly. I also added mozzarella to the excess crust and folded it over for a cheese stuffed crust and brushed the crust with olive oil and garlic salt. My son loved it. On the second recipe I added a 16 ounce can of strained diced tomatoes to the recipe. It was better than Chicago pizza I’ve had… well almost 🙂

  16. It’s my first time trying to make a deep dish pizza, and I must say it was much easier than I thought thanks to you!

    Thanks!

  17. Absolutely brilliant! I tried a few Chicago pizza recipes and this is the best by far. It’s been years since my trip to Chicago but this taste just as good as I remember the real thing.

    I’m just wondering if this would work with vegan butter/cheese do you think? I was thinking about making it for a party but one of my friends is lactose intolerant and I wouldn’t want him to miss out on the tasty goodness.

    1. So glad you loved this recipe, Holly! We haven’t tested it with vegan butter. Let us know if you do!

  18. I’m from Chicago (now living in DC). Great recipe! I’ve tried many recipes and this is my favorite for the dough. For the tomatoes, I prefer San Marzano peeled tomatoes (I use Cento brand) as the flavor is less sweet (just chop the large chunks of tomato). Shredding the onion into the tomatoes works well. I’ve added some fresh basil and red peppers to add a bit more flavor.
    I’ve also found that slicing the cheese (whole milk) makes a difference also.

  19. Fantastic recipe, love the crust. I would add if you like a really thick sauce, add a couple of tablespoons of tomato paste at the end of the cooking process. I think it needed 30 minutes or more of cook time to really get the crust done.
    I will be making this again soon.

  20. Would ’00’ pizza flour work, or do you suggest all-purpose?
    Going to try this in our pizza oven on a 16″ deep dish pan – will report back!

    1. Hi NCG, Pizza flour typically has a higher protein level and forms a stronger gluten network. It creates a chewier pizza crust. We published this recipe with all-purpose flour since it’s more commonly used in kitchens, but you can use either with no changes to the recipe. Enjoy!

  21. This was a great recipe but although the dough rose initially, it did not rise in the refrigerator so the resulting crust was a bit tough and not fluffy at all. Any ideas on what went wrong? Thanks!

  22. ———- Forwarded message ———-
    Hi Sally,
    I have made at least a dozen Chicago Deep Dish Pizza’s using your recipe all to rave reviews by family and friends that have enjoyed them.
    I have a family member that suffers from Celiac Disease but is longing for a good deep dish pizza that he could enjoy. Do you have a recipe for a gluten free Chicago Deep Dish Pizza?
    I hope that you do and look forward to preparing another deep dish pizza.
    Thank you,
    Jerry I

    1. Hi Jerry, I do not have a gluten free dough recipe for this pizza– or at all, really! I don’t have much experience with gluten free yeasted dough recipes.

  23. First deep dish pizza I have ever made and it was awesome! The crust was really quite easy and so delicious. I used about 2/3 of the dough in a 14″ deep dish pizza pan and froze the remaining 1/3 to.make a smaller one later. I had marinara sauce in the refrigerator that needed to be used but will definitely try the sauce recipe next time.

  24. I love this recipe I made I made it as a 16″ pizza using a 1x recipe.

    I started by adding a 2 pound sausage patty ring like “lumalnatis chicago classic” I also increased basil only from .5 tsp to 1 tbsp and added 10 minutes cook time.

    It turned out fantastic.
    Thank you

  25. Great recipe, I made this for a fickle deep dish pizza eater and it exceeded his expectations

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