Favorite Pumpkin Oatmeal Cookies.

These flavorful and moist pumpkin oatmeal cookies are super soft without being cakey. Truly one of my favorite ways to enjoy the fall!

The BEST Pumpkin Oatmeal Cookies. Soft, without being cakey. These are a must try!

Your weekly daily dose of pumpkin is here. And you might want to listen up. This recipe is one of the best.

You’re aware of my cakey pumpkin cookie problem, right? It took me 12 tries to develop a soft (not cakey!) pumpkin chocolate chip cookie. And last month, I finally nailed it! Those soft-baked cookies have been a HUGE hit on my website so far. Try crumbling them over vanilla ice cream…

I gave myself a new challenge over the past few weeks… to keep things exciting.

The BEST Pumpkin Oatmeal Cookies. Soft, without being cakey. These are a must try!

I’m an oatmeal cookie kind of girl. My favorite cookie varieties all include oats: oatmeal raisin, oatmeal scotchies, oatmeal creme pies (see all my faves linked below the recipe!). I’ve been craving a soft, slightly chewy pumpkin oatmeal cookie.  Lots of texture without any of that cakey business.  I baked a ton of different batches of pumpkin oatmeal cookies in 2 days, changing ingredients ever so slightly, and here is the winning recipe.

These cookies are better than I ever expected.

I brought the cookies to my friends Kristen and Seth before heading out to a double date sushi night. They both couldn’t resist a taste before dinner.  My friend Erin came over the next day and she too – couldn’t resist.  She said they were the best cookies she’s ever eaten. I made another batch of the pumpkin oatmeal cookies to bring to my friend Marie when we visited her last weekend in Cleveland. She described them as “better than an oatmeal creme pie” and “ohhhhhhh I need another one.” ;)

The BEST Pumpkin Oatmeal Cookies. Soft, without being cakey. These are a must try!

They’re dense like an oatmeal cookie should be, incredibly moist and soft-baked style without tasting like a cakey pumpkin muffin.

I made three different varieties to share with my friends because I couldn’t choose what add-ins I wanted.

  • The first? Cranberry Chocolate Chip.  Oh-so-delish, obviously.
  • The second? White Chocolate Cranberry.  Pumpkin and white chocolate are a match made in heaven.
  • And the third variety I made? Dark Chocolate Pecan with Pumpkin Seeds.  I think I liked those the best. 

The BEST Pumpkin Oatmeal Cookies. Soft, without being cakey. These are a must try!

So many goodies to choose from for your pumpkin oatmeal cookies! Do you want to know the best part? This recipe is one of the easiest cookie recipes I’ve ever made.There is no mixer required. There is no dough chilling required. No extra work, no extra dishes, no waiting around for dough to chill! When I want a pumpkin cookie, I want it NOW. And thankfully, you can have it now.

A few preliminary notes about my pumpkin oatmeal cookies:

(1) The dough is very heavy, sticky, and thick.  It will not be dry like some cookie dough. It’s very wet.

(2) Use a cookie scoop for ease. The dough is rather sticky and will get all over your hands, so make use of your cookie scoop.  I find that a cookie scoop is especially helpful when working with little bakers. Don’t have a cookie scoop? You should buy the one I swear by (in size large). Or you can use a spoon. Use about 2-3 Tablespoons of dough per cookie. It depends how large you want your cookies. When you place your cookie dough balls on the cookie sheet, press down ever so slightly. Don’t flatten the cookies, but just press them down lightly. This will give them a “spreading head start.” Here is what my cookie dough balls looked like before going into the oven:

The BEST Pumpkin Oatmeal Cookies. Soft, without being cakey. These are a must try!

(3) A third note about my cookies: don’t leave out the molasses. In the first test trial of these cookies, I didn’t add any molasses. The cookies were completely flavorless, despite the amount of spices I used! Molasses is one of my favorite fall/holiday flavors and you will love it inside these cookies.

(4) The egg. Oh the egg. I wanted my pumpkin oatmeal cookies to have a rich, tender texture without tasting cakey. Now I’ve explained to you before what an egg’s purpose is in cookie dough. I’ve also explained to you that replacing an egg with pumpkin will fix the cakey cookie problem. In the second test trial of these cookies, I did not add any eggs and the cookies were sort of dry. In the third test trial, I used an egg. Too cakey! The solution? Just use 1 egg yolk.  Surely you know how much I love using egg yolks in cookies, right? So much richness!

(5) Last but not least, I found that my cookies have the best flavor and consistency on day 2.  Similar to banana bread and carrot cake. The molasses and spices have melded together and the pumpkin flavor really comes out.  The cookies are soft and slightly chewier. In fact, there were leftover cookies by day 4 (I had made a double batch) and they were STILL so soft and flavorful. Now that’s what I call a cookie success.

The BEST Pumpkin Oatmeal Cookies. Soft, without being cakey. These are a must try!

So ladies and gentlemen… (do any males read my blog besides my dad? I know Kevin pretends to.) …I bring you my favorite pumpkin oatmeal cookies. :)

 

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Soft-Baked Pumpkin Oatmeal Cookies

These spiced, flavorful pumpkin oatmeal cookies are soft without being cakey. No dough chilling, no mixer, less dishes, more cookies!

Yield: 15-18 large cookies

Prep Time: 15 minutes

Total Time: 30 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups + 1 Tablespoon all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 Tablespoon ground cinnamon
  • 1 heaping teaspoon pumpkin pie spice*
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 and 1/2 cups old-fashioned rolled oats
  • 1 cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter, melted
  • 1/4 cup dark molasses
  • 3/4 cup dark brown sugar (or light)
  • 1/2 cup granulated sugar
  • 1 egg yolk
  • 3/4 cup pumpkin puree**
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 and 1/2 cups total add-ins* (chocolate chips, dried cranberries, pumpkin seeds, pecans, white chocolate, or a combination)

Directions:

Preheat the oven to 350F degrees. Line two baking sheets with parchment paper or silicone baking mats. Set aside.

In a large bowl, toss the flour, baking soda, cinnamon, pumpkin pie spice, and salt together. Fold in the oats. Set aside.

Melt the butter in the microwave in a medium size bowl.  Whisk in the molasses, brown sugar, and granulated sugar. Once combined, whisk in the egg.  Add the pumpkin and vanilla and whisk until thick and combined completely. Pour into dry ingredients and gently mix. The dough will be very thick, heavy, and sticky. Keep mixing until just combined, no more. Fold in your add-ins.

Scoop cookie dough onto prepared baking sheets. About 2 or 3 Tablespoons of dough per cookie. Slightly flatten the help the cookies spread in the oven. Do not flatten completely. See my photo above for a visual. If desired, press a few of your add-ins onto the top of the cookie dough balls for looks.

Bake the cookies for 13-15 minutes until very lightly browned on the edges, and still appearing soft in the centers.  My cookies took 14 minutes.  Allow the cookies to cool completely on the baking sheets. The cookies' flavor is best on day 2. Cookies remain fresh and soft stored in an airtight container for 10 days.

*Instead of the pumpkin pie spice, you may use 1/4 teaspoon each: ground cloves, ground nutmeg, ground allspice.

**IMPORTANT: This recipe is tested with Libby's pumpkin puree, which is much less "watery" than other brands (such as Trader Joe's). More water in your pumpkin = cakey cookies. If you think your pumpkin puree is too moist, add a paper bowl to a bowl. Top with 3/4 cup pumpkin puree. Top with another paper towel and "blot" the pumpkin to remove some moisture.

*Make sure you use 1.5 cups total add-ins. For example, 1/2 cup of chocolate chips, 1/2 cup of pecans, 1/2 cup of dried cranberries. 

© Sally’s Baking Addiction. All images & content are copyright protected. Please do not use my images without prior permission. If you want to republish this recipe, please re-write the recipe in your own words, or link back to this post for the recipe.

 

Looking for a healthier pumpkin oatmeal cookie?

Low Fat Chocolate Chip Pumpkin Oatmeal Cookies

 

Pumpkin oatmeal cookies: another reason to smile today.

Pumpkin Oatmeal Cookies

 

 

   

143 Responses to “Favorite Pumpkin Oatmeal Cookies.”

  1. #
    61
    Michelle @ My Gluten-free Kitchenposted October 29, 2013 at 10:33 pm

    Sally – these rock! I’m not usually crazy about the taste of pumpkin except in my pumpkin bars. When I saw these cookies though, I really wanted to give them a try. I’m so glad I did as I loved them, and so did my hubby and oldest son. He’s been begging for another cookie each day this week!
    I just made a few changes to make them gluten-free, and I went with the white chocolate and cranberry version. I just posted my altered recipe, with links back to you of course.
    Thanks so much for sharing this yummy recipe. My photos aren’t to your caliber, but will hopefully inspire some gluten-free folks to try these too.
    Have a good night!

    Reply

  2. #
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    peteposted October 30, 2013 at 4:04 pm

    In response to your question…yes…guys do read your blog. I’m a big oatmeal cookie fan, and I’m looking forward to trying this recipe.

    Reply

    • Sallyreplied on October 30th, 2013 at 6:45 pm

      Thanks Pete! It’s nice to hear from the guys! Let me know how you like these cookies.

      Reply

  3. #
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    amyposted October 31, 2013 at 1:07 pm

    Wondering if there is anything I can use to substitute the molasses…. we are not molasses fans

    Reply

    • Sallyreplied on October 31st, 2013 at 8:11 pm

      Hi Amy, you could try maple syrup or honey instead.

      Reply

  4. #
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    Alissaposted October 31, 2013 at 7:51 pm

    I’ve made these twice in the past two week, and HOLY MOLY, big winner here! Both times I used the same add-ins: chopped pecans, semi-sweet and white chocolate chips. In the second batch, I pressed in some caramel pieces (before baking) that I wanted to use up. These are perfect in texture and taste exactly like fall. Another killer recipe, Sally!

    Reply

    • Sallyreplied on October 31st, 2013 at 7:52 pm

      Just when I thought I’ve tried all of the add-ins I could, you mention caramel. DUH! I need to try that next. Thank you Alissa, I’m glad you love these!

      Reply

  5. #
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    Melanieposted November 1, 2013 at 8:34 pm

    I have one more pan to bake so I’ll try to press them down a little more than I did the other batches. Thanks!

    Reply

  6. #
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    susan hposted November 6, 2013 at 9:46 am

    I made this outof this world, used Peanut M&M’s, then used a Caramel buttercream filling and a Maple cream cheese filling to make whoopie pies, delicious

    Reply

    • Sallyreplied on November 6th, 2013 at 12:45 pm

      Your version sounds to die for! I have to try these with a caramel buttercream. Amazing idea, thank you Susan!

      Reply

      • susan hreplied on November 6th, 2013 at 1:45 pm

        most welcome. I love your site and your ideas and I love to play with recipes, so your additional information on why things work is super helpful. I think it is my chemistry background which makes me want to understand the process and science behind it.

  7. #
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    susan hposted November 7, 2013 at 4:59 pm

    I also forgot to say, we grew a ton of buttercup squash this year in our garden, so I used some squash from a buttercup squash I had oven roasted. Good way to use it up as I am afraid our skin is turning orange from all the times and ways I have served it, mixed in with Mac and Cheese, in a pasta cream sauce, coffeecake and breads, in a soup recipe I made up, as well as plain of course.

    Reply

  8. #
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    Justeenposted November 10, 2013 at 11:10 pm

    Loved the texture of these cookies, but I tasted more molasses than pumpkin. Next time I will use 2 tablespoons molasses and 2 tablespoons of maple syrup. I used toasted hazelnuts, crystallized ginger, and white chocolate chips as my mix-ins. Great recipe!

    Reply

  9. #
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    Megan @ For the Love of Cookiesposted November 14, 2013 at 11:26 am

    To bring to a party, would you recommend these or the chewy pumpkin chocolate chip cookies? I can’t decide because they both look fabulous!

    Reply

    • Sallyreplied on November 14th, 2013 at 4:09 pm

      Hmm. I would go with the chewy pumpkin chocolate chip cookies. Some people don’t really like oats and/or oatmeal cookies. And everyone loves chocolate chip.

      Reply

  10. #
    70
    Rosa Paredesposted November 16, 2013 at 8:34 pm

    BEST cookies EVER. I’ve decided this will be the basic recipe and I will just keep changing the add ons. This first time I used mixed nuts and cranberries; can’t stop myself. I’ve become the cookie monster!!!!
    Thank you :)

    Rosa

    Reply

  11. #
    71
    Rosa Paredesposted November 16, 2013 at 8:37 pm

    I’m all about baking from scratch, so I used organic pumpkin, cooked and mashed it, and it was perfect; not watery at all.

    Reply

  12. #
    72
    Stephanie Adamsposted November 24, 2013 at 6:34 pm

    Oh my goodness! These ARE the BEST pumpkin cookies I’ve ever had. Thank you for sharing the recipe. We have a favorite oatmeal chocolate chip cookie recipe we make all of the time and I wanted to have pumpkins cookies, because ’tis the season, but still wanted oatmeal chocolate chip. And these are perfect. I am going to turn into a pumpkin oatmeal chocolate chip cookie because I have eaten so many in making this 3 times in the last week. Anyway, thanks again for a delicious recipe!

    Reply

    • Sallyreplied on November 24th, 2013 at 7:53 pm

      I am so glad you love these cookies as much as I do, Stephanie! Reading this tonight made me very happy. Thank YOU for reporting back. Have a great Thanksgiving!

      Reply

  13. #
    73
    Ginaposted December 12, 2013 at 2:15 am

    I’d like to make dough in advance in anticipation of down time for a medical necessity. My husband loves oatmeal cookies and it’d be easy for him to bake a nice small batch quickly for dessert while I’m recuperating. What do you think. To freeze or not to freeze? I was thinking in pre-scooped portions frozen on a cookie sheet before packaging in a sealed container. Gina

    Reply

    • Sallyreplied on December 12th, 2013 at 7:39 am

      Hi Gina, yes you may freeze this dough into balls. The dough is much too liquidy to roll, so just scoop into balls with a cookie scoop or spoon and then freeze on a plate or small tray. Then bake for a couple minutes extra in their frozen state or let thaw slightly on the counter before baking.

      Reply

      • Ginareplied on December 15th, 2013 at 5:45 pm

        Thanks. I think I’ll make a trial batch this week and freeze half as a tester. I’ve got just enough pumpkin. Thanks for your speedy reply.

  14. #
    74
    Diane in Wisconsinposted January 4, 2014 at 3:08 pm

    Looking for something to do with home processed pumpkin (used the paper towels) – awesome cookies and bake a lot ’cause I married the Cookie Monster! Thanks for this great recipe.

    Reply

    • Sallyreplied on January 4th, 2014 at 3:41 pm

      And I thought I was marrying the cookie monster. ;) Happy you liked these! Thanks Diane.

      Reply

  15. #
    75
    Danielleposted January 6, 2014 at 5:28 pm

    These are yummy! We were bored today (blizzard yesterday, 30-40 degrees BELOW zero today) so we just made these! The kiddos and adults all like :) Thank you!

    Reply

    • Sallyreplied on January 6th, 2014 at 6:24 pm

      Danielle, the weather here lately in Maryland has been frigid! Tomorrow we’ll see a low of 7 degrees. Which definitely is no where near as bad as your blizzard but still cold for this area! So happy you enjoyed these cupcakes.

      Reply

  16. #
    76
    Amy Davisposted January 12, 2014 at 12:42 pm

    My cookies are scrumpdillicious! But, very dark? The molasses and dark brown sugar made them much darker than your are? And I don’t mind, of-course, except they really don’t look like pumpkin cookies, per se.

    Reply

    • Sallyreplied on January 12th, 2014 at 2:51 pm

      Hey Amy! It could just be the lighting. And the type of molasses. If you are using dark or blackstrap molasses, that is why. I’m happy you like them!

      Reply

  17. #
    77
    Juliaposted January 19, 2014 at 3:41 pm

    I have a can of pumpkin pie filling instead of pumpkin puree from Christmas. I’d love to use that instead but I wouldn’t know where to begin. This looks so delicious! I’ll bookmark this for when I have pumpkin puree!

    Reply

    • Sallyreplied on January 20th, 2014 at 8:32 am

      Yes, definitely need pure pumpkin puree for these cookies. Let me know if you give them a try sometime!

      Reply

  18. #
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    Jenposted February 9, 2014 at 11:03 am

    I substituted some of the butter for coconut oil (3/4 cup coconut oil:1/4 cup butter) and used spelt flour. They were crispy on the outside and chewy on the inside. Next time, I will try switching blackstrap molasses for fancy molasses and I might try reducing the granulated sugar. I hope the cookies will still be crispy. Thanks for a great recipe!!!

    Reply

  19. #
    79
    Rachaelposted February 9, 2014 at 3:14 pm

    Hi Sally. These look incredible and sound delicious! Being an avid reader of your blog, I know you have many oatmeal cookie recipes. You also have a “tried and true” chocolate chip cookie recipe as well as chocolate and peanut butter cookie recipes. I was wondering if you have a good old fashioned “tried and true” recipe for oatmeal raisin cookies?

    Just plain ones, oatmeal cookies are pretty much my favorite (especially with chocolate or peanut butter…or both!). So I was wondering if you have a go to recipe for plain oatmeal raisin cookies that you could share? Thanks!!

    Reply

  20. #
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    Loriposted March 13, 2014 at 10:02 pm

    I am in LOVE! It is starting to get hot here in the desert so time to pull out some of my pumpkin. Was hunting around and found this recipe. SO HAPPY I DID!!
    These cookies are amazing. I used milk chocolate chip cookies and pecans.
    How long did you leave on the cookie sheets to cool?

    Reply

    • Sallyreplied on March 14th, 2014 at 10:12 am

      Hi Lori! I leave them on the cookie sheets to cool for about 10 minutes. Then gobble them up. They’re the best! Thanks for reporting back.

      Reply

  21. #
    81
    Melissaposted April 8, 2014 at 4:51 pm

    I just had to tell you that I absolutely adore this recipe. I found it last fall while looking for pumpkin recipes, and it’s been a great success every time. I always tend to have half-used bags of chips or dried fruit in my cupboard left over from other baking projects, so it’s also a fantastic recipe to use up some of those extras. I was inspired to write in after I brought a batch to work (the last of my white chocolate chips, butterscotch chips, and dried cranberries) and immediately had a coworker hunt me down to rave about them.

    In case any of your readers are curious, I’m at 5,000 ft and these cookies bake up perfectly. I increase the baking time a few minutes to firm them up a bit more, but they’re still moist.

    Reply

    • Sallyreplied on April 8th, 2014 at 9:34 pm

      Hey Melissa! I’m so glad that you love these pumpkin cookies so much. They’re clearly my favorite too! Great to know about your altitude too – very helpful for other readers I’m sure! I love them with butterscotch. So good!

      Reply

  22. #
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    Katherine Tishposted June 3, 2014 at 10:17 pm

    Sally,
    The oatmeal pumpkin cookies look delicious. I’m hoping to give them a try this coming weekend. Thanks for sharing.

    Reply

  23. #
    83
    Katrinaposted June 18, 2014 at 3:01 pm

    Wow! Just made these with banana instead of pumpkin (because it’s June) and used chocolate chips and coconut as my add-ins (and used whole wheat flour). They are delicious! Thank you!

    Reply

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