Chewy Chocolate Chunk Cookies

An easy, no-mixer required recipe for super chewy, soft, and perfect chocolate chip cookies.

This post has a lot of text! I really want to explain exactly what makes these cookies so chewy, soft, and thick so your cookies can be a success. You can simply skip down to the recipe if you don’t want to read it all. 🙂

Chewy Chocolate Chunk Cookies - learn the secrets to making them extra soft and thick! sallysbakingaddiction.com

There are hundreds of chocolate chip cookie recipes out there. Everyone has their favorite! But today’s recipe stands out in my mind. They are the chewiest of chewy. The softest of soft. Thick, underbaked, buttery dough, and exploding with chocolate. Warning: this chocolate chip cookie requires a tall glass of milk. See for yourself right here:

Wednesday is National Chocolate Chip Day, so I made you a new chocolate chip cookie recipe to celebrate! And I’ve made them 5 times in the past two weeks. No lie. I tested them over and over and over again to make sure they were as good as the first time before sharing with you. You only get the best of the best. I made 2 batches with chocolate chunks and the rest with other goodies inside. And yes, each batch is perfection.

Chewy Chocolate Chunk Cookies - learn the secrets to making them extra soft and thick! sallysbakingaddiction.com

Don’t get me wrong.  I still have a huge space in my heart (and tastebuds) for my Perfect Chocolate Chip Cookie recipe.  It’s one of the most popular recipes on my website. You all love them!

Today’s recipe is similar, but I increased the chewy factor. 

The cookie dough is made from standard cookie dough ingredients.  Flour, leavener, salt, sugar, butter, egg, & vanilla.  It’s the ratios of those ingredients that make this recipe stand out against the rest.  2.25 cups of flour is mixed with 1 teaspoon of baking soda, 1/2 teaspoon of salt, and my favorite: cornstarch!  I used 1.5 teaspoons of cornstarch in this recipe.  It gives the cookies that ultra soft-baked consistency we all know and love.  Plus, it makes the cookies super thick.

You’ll use melted butter in this cookie recipe. Most of the cookies on my website call for creaming softened butter with the sugars.  My new chocolate chip cookie recipe requires melted butter.  It increases the chewy factor in the baked cookie. Melted butter can make your baked cookie greasy, so I made sure there was enough flour to avoid that from happening.  Since you are using melted butter, you don’t need a mixer for this cookie recipe! Ironically, I’m giving away a free KitchenAid Stand Mixer right now.

Chewy Chocolate Chunk Cookies - learn the secrets to making them extra soft and thick! sallysbakingaddiction.com

Chewy Chocolate Chunk Cookies - learn the secrets to making them soft and thick! sallysbakingaddiction.com

To the melted butter, add 3/4 cup of brown sugar and 1/2 cup of white sugar. Extra brown sugar increases the moist-factor, softness, and chewiness in the final cookie.  The white sugar induces slight spreading so your cookies don’t remain balls of dough in the oven.  A little bit of spread is a good thing.  Too much spreading? No thank you. Thankfully, these cookies remain nice and thick in the oven because of the cornstarch, flour, and baking soda.

Another way to ensure these cookies are extra chewy is to add an extra egg yolk.  The extra egg yolk adds richness, soft tenderness, and binds the dough. So you will need 1 egg and 1 egg yolk.  You can freeze the extra egg white in a ziplock baggie for up to 1 month or use it to make my Skinny Chocolate Peanut Butter Cupcakes.

Finally, add 2 teaspoons of vanilla extract and your chocolate chunks.  I used a combination of Nestle Chocolate Chunks and Mini Chocolate Chips. You can use standard size semi-sweet chocolate chips or milk chocolate chips if you prefer.

The dough will be soft and the chocolate chunks may not stick because of the melted butter. Just keep stirring it. Next step is to chill the dough. I can’t stress this step enough.  Chilling the dough is mandatory for most of my cookie recipes. It allows the ingredients to settle together after the mixing stage. But most importantly: cold dough results in thicker cookies. This cookie dough will spread in the oven if you bake it at room temperature. Cover the cookie dough and chill the dough for at least 3 hours, and even up to 3 days. I chilled this dough for 1 day. After chilling, let your cookie dough sit at room temperature for 10 minutes before rolling into balls.

After chilling, sometimes I roll the cookie dough into balls and freeze them in a large zipped-top bag. Then I bake them in their frozen state – keeping them in the oven for an extra minute.  This way you can have just one of two cookies whenever you want!

The BEST Chocolate Chip Cookies by sallysbakingaddiction.com

These cookies are huge.  About 3 Tablespoons of dough is rolled to make one cookie. The batch only makes about 16 cookies since you will be rolling them so large.  It was the perfect amount to share with Kevin’s family for Mother’s Day and have extras for our cookie jar. Feel free to make the cookies smaller (about 2 Tablespoons of dough per cookie) instead. If you do that, be sure to reduce the baking time to 8 minutes. For me? Well, sometimes you just gotta have a monster size chocolate cookie.

When you remove the cookie dough from the refrigerator after chilling, the dough will be slightly crumbly.  The warmth of your hands rolling it will make it stay intact. Roll the cookie dough balls taller, rather than wide as I discussed and showed here. This little tried-and-true trick will result in thicker cookies. I do it for every single cookie I bake.

The large cookies take 11-12 minutes in the oven. Try not to overbake them. The cookies will appear very soft and undone. However, they will continue to bake for about 10 minutes as you allow them to cool on the cookie sheet. The cookies you see here were baked for 11 minutes.

In short, here are my secrets to thick, soft, & chewy cookies: 

Underbaked cookies are the secret to softness. Using cornstarch in the dough is another secret to softness, as well as the secret to thickness. Using more brown sugar than white sugar results in a moister, softer cookie.  Adding an extra egg yolk increases chewiness. Rolling the cookie dough balls to be taller than wider increases thickness. Using melted butter (and slightly more flour) increases chewiness. Chilling the dough results in a thicker cookie.

I love these super chewy cookies as much as my original chocolate chip cookie recipe. Give them a try, you won’t be disappointed.

Chewy Chocolate Chip Cookies with M&Ms by sallysbakingaddiction.com

Bonus: try them with half M&Ms and half chocolate chunks!

Click HERE to pin this recipe for later!

Chewy Chocolate Chunk Cookies

Soft-baked and ultra chewy. No mixer required. Use any of your favorite add-ins!

Ingredients:

  • 2 and 1/4 cups (280g) all-purpose flour (spoon & leveled)
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 and 1/2 teaspoons cornstarch
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 3/4 cup (1.5 sticks or 170g) unsalted butter, melted1
  • 3/4 cup (135g) loosely packed light brown sugar
  • 1/2 cup (100g) granulated sugar
  • 1 large egg + 1 egg yolk, at room temperature2
  • 2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract
  • 1 cup (180g) semi-sweet chocolate chips or chocolate chunks

Directions:

  1. Click here for step-by-step photos and careful explanations of all of these steps. Great for visual learners!
  2. Whisk the flour, baking soda, cornstarch, and salt together in a large bowl. Set aside.
  3. In a medium bowl, whisk the melted butter, brown sugar, and granulated sugar together until no brown sugar lumps remain. Whisk in the egg, then the egg yolk. Finally, whisk in the vanilla extract. Pour the wet ingredients into the dry ingredients and mix together with a large spoon or rubber spatula. The dough will be very soft, yet thick. Fold in the chocolate chunks. They may not stick to the dough because of the melted butter, but do your best to combine them. Cover the dough and chill in the refrigerator for 3 hours or up to 3-4 days. Chilling is mandatory. I highly recommend chilling the cookie dough overnight for less spreading.
  4. Take the dough out of the refrigerator and allow to slightly soften at room temperature for 10 minutes.
  5. Preheat oven to 325°F (163°C). Line two large baking sheets with parchment paper or silicone baking mats. (Always recommended for cookies.) Set aside.
  6. Roll the dough into balls, about 3 Tablespoons of dough each. The dough will be crumbly, but the warmth of your hands will help the balls stay together. Roll the cookie dough balls to be taller rather than wide, to ensure the cookies will bake up to be thick. See this post for more clarity and a photo. Place 8 balls of dough onto each cookie sheet. Press a few more chocolate chips/chunks on top of the dough balls for looks, if desired. Bake the cookies for 11-12 minutes. The cookies will look very soft and underbaked. They will continue to bake on the cookie sheet. Allow to cool on the cookie sheet for 10 minutes before transferring to a wire rack to cool completely.

Make ahead tip: Cookies stay fresh covered at room temperature for up to 1 week. You can make the cookie dough and chill it in the refrigerator for up to 2-3 days. Allow to come to room temperature then continue with step 5. Baked cookies freeze well for up to 3 months. Unbaked cookie dough balls freeze well for up to 3 months. Bake frozen cookie dough balls for an extra minute, no need to thaw. Click here for my tips and tricks on freezing cookie dough.

Recipe Notes:

  1. Salted butter can be used instead. Reduce salt in the cookie dough to 1/4 teaspoon.
  2. Room temperature egg + egg yolk are preferred. Typically, if a recipe calls for room temperature or melted butter, it's a good idea to use room temperature eggs as well. To bring eggs to room temperature quickly, simply place the whole eggs into a glass of warm water for 5 minutes. What to do with the extra egg white? Make these or these.

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© Sally’s Baking Addiction. All images & content are copyright protected. Please do not use my images without prior permission. If you want to republish this recipe, please re-write the recipe in your own words, or link back to this post for the recipe.

Updated: click here for step-by-step photos of how to make these cookies.

My other favorite chocolate chip cookies are just as soft & thick as today’s. They are not as chewy, but still a winning recipe in my heart and with my tastebuds.

Soft-Baked Chocolate Chip Cookies

Here is a post I created with 25 of my favorite Chocolate Chip Cookie recipes. This is a must see!

25 Chocolate Chip Cookie Recipes

Make a Giant Chocolate Chip Cookie CAKE next time.

Chocolate Chip Cookie Cake with Milk Chocolate Frosting by sallysbakingaddiction.com

See more cookie recipes.

Chewy Chocolate Chunk Cookies have been pinned on Pinterest over 1 MILLION times. My most popular recipe!

Chewy Chocolate Chunk Cookies have been pinned on Pinterest over 1 MILLION times. My most popular recipe!

1,406 comments

  1. It sounds like maybe you’re looking for something else in a cookie. Most of the cookie recipes I’ve tried end up like what you’ve described on purpose. Perhaps look up a”cakey” chocolate chip recipe. Sounds like it might be more your jam. 🙂

  2. My hubby is diabetic can I use a sugar substitute?

  3. Would I be able to sub some of the flour with kodiakccakes mix? 

  4. Okay so your chewy chocolate chunk cookies are my favorite cookies of all time! I tried every chocolate chip cookie recipe and these are the bees knees! So I make them all the time and they always turn our perfect-soft, they have dimension-they look and taste good. But the past two times I have made them they are turning out flat and almost greasy looking. They still taste good but the texture is not the same. Thoughts on what I might be doing wrong?! 

  5. Hey Sally! I made your chewy chocolate chunk last week for the first time and they were a huge hit in our house! I made two batches the first time, and substituted the chocolate chips with reese’s pieces. they turned out fantastic! I just made two more batches, one with reese’s pieces again, and the other with chocolate chips, and the batch with the reese’s pieces turned out flat for some reason. Do you know what might have caused this to happen? 

    Thanks! 
    Chelsea 

    • Not Sally, but they might’ve been too warm before you put them in. I just made these and one pan ended up thick and chewy while the other came out flat, grey, and bland. The second batch held the initially warmer cookies (I separated them by temperature onto the two pans beforehand) and they spread way too early.  

  6. Hi Sally,
    Thanks so much for letting us take advantage of your expertise and passion. You have become my go to for desserts. I’m going to bake your chewy chocolate chip cookies for the first time. Will it be OK to use brown butter?

    Thanks,
    Sheila

  7. I love your sight and ALL of your recipes! I am a home baker and am interested in creating a blog of my own. Do you have any suggestions for an easy to use, free site, to start my own blog?

  8. I’ve been making these for about 2 years. I change up the chocolate chips sometimes, but just love the addition of the corn starch. Thank you for posting this. My boys thank you too.

  9. Just wanted to say thank you for all your recipes! I have many from your site over the years, and in the last year A TON! You are my go to site! These babies are chilling in the refrigerator as we speak and I CAN’T WAIT until your cookbook comes out with the crispy edge version :). These will be the dessert for my 3-year olds birthday in a few days as she is way more into cookies than cake. They will have sprinkles of course! Pink and Purple per her request. Thank you for sharing your passion with us and taking the time to be so detailed with your pictures, comments, and notes for each recipe. I am not much of a “commenter” but just had to say a HUGE thank you this evening :).

  10. Would it be okay to use cake flour instead of the all-purpose flour? Would I still use cornstarch with the cake flour?

  11. I added 1/4 cup flour for high elevation but it dried out the dough too much. Any recommendations for high elevation?  Should I use less baking soda?

    • I live in Colorado. And I usually don’t have a problem. But I never level out my flour, I kinda keep in a a heap that way I get a little more of the flour to help keep it all together. And that usually works for me already. I always make sure my dough is super chilled and even will put the pre rolled balls in the fridge while the others are baking. I know it wasn’t super specific but maybe it will help. My sister bakes as well and we both agree sometime up here you just don’t need to be as precise as lower level altitudes. 

    • I live at just over 7,000 elevation. I normally increase flour by one tablespoon for each cup, decrease sugar by 2-3 tablespoons per cup, and decrease leavening by 1/4. If a recipe calls for liquid, I add 3-4 tablespoons of liquid per cup called for in the recipe. Good luck next time!

  12. Hi Sally, 

    I absolutely love your chocolate chip cookie recipe and used to make them all the time when I lived in CT. Now I live in Santa Fe, NM and worried about the high altitude differences. Do you have suggestions on how I could alter the recipe to fit high altitude? 

    Thanks so much! 

    Jessilyn 

  13. Hi Sally
    I am from Germany and have searched for a perfect cookie recipe and found yours. And I have to say “I love your cookies”. This is the best recipe for cookies I ever tried. So I would like to thank you for the great recipe.
    Thanks, Jennifer.

  14. Hi Sally!
    I just made these cookies on the weekend. The taste was amazing however they still kept their tall shape rather than flattening out (I used a spatula to flatten them when they came out of the oven so that they would have that flat cookie shape). I used 2 tbsp per cookie rather than 3. I chilled the dough for 4.5 hours and brought out the bowl to sit for 10 mins before rolling into balls. Should the dough have sat longer to reach room temperature?

  15. Hi Sally,
    I recently came across this recipe and have been wanting to try it out for a while. However, I am vegetarian – any ideas on what I can substitute the egg yolk with?
    Thanks so much!

  16. I swear I have tried every chocolate chip cookie recipe in existence and this is one of my favorites! It’s even better if you brown the butter first. I add a couple tablespoons of milk to replace the lost water.

  17. My 8 year old daughter was pinning cookie recipes for me and I told her to find a chocolate chip one we could try. Yours was the lucky one and wow what an amazing cookie! I have tried and baked my share of chocolate chip cookies but this one is my new go too!  Making it tonight for the 2nd time and anxiously waiting for the dough to chill in the refrigerator. Thank you for sharing and I really appreciate your notes, tips and most of all the step by step pictures.  Thanks again from Canada!

  18. If you double this recipe, be sure to let it chill for twice as long! I made these with awesome result countless times and then when I started to double the recipe, they kept turning out so flat and greasy. But this last time,  I kept the double recipe dough in the fridge for 6 hours and they turned out perfectly as before! It’s seriously the best chocolate chip cookie recipe out there. 

  19. These are amazing. I’ve made them with chocolate chips, butterscotch chips, and this past weekend I did white chocolate and chopped macadamia nuts. On a whim, I browned the butter and WOW it totally took the flavor to the next level. These cookies stay soft and chewy for days!! Thanks for this incredible recipe Sally!

  20. I made this during the weekend and everyone wanted seconds! I made a double batch right away just because I found it was so easy to do after the first batch, and that dough was looking really.. sexy..? xD I stuck the dough in the fridge for around two days, and it didn’t quite spread like yours so they sorta tasted better than they looked (and it tasted really dang good). I flattened the balls myself before sticking them in the oven. I think it’s because I reduced the white sugar to half the amount, and since you said it’s sugar that promotes spreading + two days in the fridge = no spreading.
    But it didn’t matter! These cookies tasted deeee-vine and I will definitely be making them again (and with prolly less time in the fridge!)

  21. Hi Sally,

    I want to make these smaller – getting 32 cookies per patch. Is everything still the same? Will I bake for less time?

    Thanks!

  22. Hi Sally! I really really need your help!!! I’ve already made my 4th batch of cookies using your amazing recipe. However, every time it comes out of the oven and even if I let it sit on a rack to cool down, the inside of the cookie seems undercooked. I’m using a 9×13″ QUARTER BAKING PAN by the way. The outside though is baked and quite crunchy which seems successful and it tastes really good  Am I doing something wrong? It doesn’t reflect the photo of your cookie at all 🙁 Does the baking pan affect the outcome of the cookie? Please answer this. Thanks a lot❤❤❤

     

  23. I am a chocolate chip cookie fiend!!! Looks so chewy and moist!

  24. Hi Sally as I am waiting for you to go live on facebook live I wanted to ask some questions regarding your chewy chocolate chunk cookies. I made the dough yesterday following the exact directions and I chilled the dough in the freezer for one hour. I preheated my oven and stuck the cookies in the oven and they became a mono cookie. Maybe I did not chill it properly. Today after one day in the fridge the dough is super chilled and cold but still pliable, I mean is not rock hard frozen is it ok? I will try your tips and tricks and bake just one to see how it behaves and I will actually make a tall rather than thicker ball. Thank you so much for sharing.. God Bless u and your baby! lots of love from Montevideo.

  25. Is it ok to substitute with wheat flour? If so, do you know the measurement?
    Thanks

  26. After the baking time i have to let them rest for 10 min into or out the oven ?

    (Sorry for my bad english)

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