Soft & Chewy Oatmeal Raisin Cookies

Soft and chewy with that trademark homemade flavor, these are the best soft and chewy oatmeal raisin cookies. Made with brown sugar, vanilla, cinnamon, chewy oats, sweet raisins, and a secret ingredient, this recipe wins for flavor and texture. Your family will love these easy oatmeal raisin cookies!

Oatmeal raisin cookies

There are two types of people in this world. Raisin haters and raisin lovers. I fall into the latter category. Besides homemade apple pie, oatmeal raisin cookies are my favorite dessert. There’s something incredibly magical about their chewy texture, soft centers, plump raisins, and cinnamon flavor. Please tell me I’m not the only raisin lover!!

Oatmeal raisin cookies

What Makes These Oatmeal Raisin Cookies The Best

The competition is strong, but here’s why you’ll fall in love with these cookies.

  • Moist and tender centers
  • Slight crisp on the edges
  • Sweetened with brown sugar
  • Loaded with oats
  • Studded with raisins
  • Cinnamon spiced
  • Buttery flavor
  • 30 minute chill time

It doesn’t get much better than this!

Oatmeal raisin cookie dough balls on baking sheet

Ingredients in Oatmeal Raisin Cookies

Oatmeal raisin cookies are made with very basic ingredients.

  1. Butter: Butter is the base of any delicious cookie recipe. Make sure it’s appropriately softened to room temperature.
  2. Brown Sugar + Granulated Sugar: Sugar is not only used for sweetness, but also for providing structure and tenderness. I like to use more brown sugar than white sugar because (1) brown sugar has incredible flavor and (2) brown sugar contains more moisture than white, which produces a softer cookie.
  3. Eggs: Eggs help bind everything together. You need 2 eggs in this recipe.
  4. Pure Vanilla Extract + Salt: Both provide flavor.
  5. Cinnamon: Raisins, oats, and cinnamon are winning flavor combination.
  6. Baking Soda: Baking soda helps the cookies rise.
  7. Molasses: Molasses is my secret ingredient! 1 scant Tablespoon enhances all the wonderful flavors of these buttery, cinnamon-sweet oatmeal raisin cookies.
  8. Flour: Flour is the structure of the cookies.
  9. Oats: There are a ton of oats in this recipe! Oats provide a fabulously chewy texture.
  10. Raisins: I love to soak the raisins in warm water before using. This step is optional, but it guarantees they are plump and soft. Blot dry before adding to cookie dough.

You can also add chopped walnuts. Nuts are totally optional but highly recommended. These simple ingredients combine to make the best oatmeal raisin cookies!

Oatmeal raisin cookies


How to Make Oatmeal Raisin Cookies

There’s only a few steps between now and a batch of warm oatmeal cookies. 🙂

  1. Cream butter + sugars: Use a hand or stand mixer to cream the softened butter with both sugars until smooth, about 2 minutes on medium speed.
  2. Add eggs, vanilla, + molasses: Add eggs, then mix on high for about 1 minute until incorporated. Add vanilla and molasses, mix until combined.
  3. Dry ingredients: Mix flour, baking soda, cinnamon, and salt together in a separate bowl. Pour this into the wet ingredients. Combine together on low.
  4. Add the extras: Beat in the oats and raisins on low speed. Dough will be thick and sticky.
  5. Chill: Refrigerate the cookie dough for 30-60 minutes.
  6. Roll: Roll cookie dough into balls and place on a lined baking sheet. I love using these baking mats.
  7. Bake: Bake the cookies at 350°F (177°C) for 12-13 minutes until lightly browned. The cookies might look under-baked, but they will continue to set as they cool. This is the secret to a soft and chewy oatmeal raisin cookie!

Oatmeal Raisin Cookie Dough is Sticky

This oatmeal raisin cookie dough is sticky, so don’t be alarmed. The cookie dough needs to chill for about 30 minutes before baking. I don’t recommend keeping this cookie dough in the refrigerator for much longer because your cookies won’t spread. The oats will begin to absorb all of the wonderful moisture from the eggs, butter, and sugar and won’t expand as they bake. Sticky dough is good dough!

Oatmeal raisin cookies

More Favorite Cookie Recipes

If you love these oatmeal raisin cookies, try any of these SOFT cookie recipes. You’ll wonder why you haven’t baked them sooner!

Print
Oatmeal raisin cookies

Soft and Chewy Oatmeal Raisin Cookies

  • Author: Sally
  • Prep Time: 45 minutes
  • Cook Time: 13 minutes
  • Total Time: 1 hour
  • Yield: 26-30 cookies
  • Category: Dessert
  • Method: Baking
  • Cuisine: American

Description

Soft and chewy with that trademark homemade flavor, these are the best soft and chewy oatmeal raisin cookies. Your family will love these easy oatmeal raisin cookies!


Ingredients

  • 1 cup (230g) unsalted butter, softened to room temperature
  • 1 cup (200g) packed light or dark brown sugar
  • 1/4 cup (50g) granulated sugar
  • 2 large eggs*
  • 1 Tablespoon pure vanilla extract (yes, Tablespoon!)
  • 1 Tablespoon molasses
  • 1 and 1/2 cups (190g) all-purpose flour (spoon & leveled)
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 and 1/2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 3 cups (240g) old-fashioned whole rolled oats*
  • 1 cup (140g) raisins*
  • optional: 1/2 cup (64g) chopped toasted walnuts

Instructions

  1. Using a hand mixer or a stand mixer fitted with paddle attachment, cream the softened butter and both sugars together on medium speed until smooth, about 2 minutes. Add the eggs and mix on high until combined, about 1 minute. Scrape down the sides and bottom of the bowl as needed. Add the vanilla and molasses and mix on high until combined. Set aside.
  2. In a separate bowl, toss the flour, baking soda, cinnamon, and salt together. Add to the wet ingredients and mix on low until combined. Beat in the oats, raisins, and walnuts (if using) on low speed. Dough will be thick, yet very sticky. Chill the dough for 30-60 minutes in the refrigerator (do the full hour if you’re afraid of the cookies spreading too much). If chilling for longer (up to 2 days), allow to sit at room temperature for at least 30 minutes before rolling and baking.
  3. Preheat oven to 350°F (177°C). Line two large baking sheets with parchment paper or silicone baking mats. Set aside.
  4. Roll balls of dough (about 2 tablespoons of dough per cookie) and place 2 inches apart on the baking sheets. Bake for 12-13 minutes until lightly browned on the sides. The centers will look very soft and undone. Remove from the oven and let cool on baking sheet for 5 minutes before transferring to a wire rack to cool completely. The cookies will continue to “set” on the baking sheet during this time.

Notes

  1. Make Ahead & Freezing Instructions: Cookies stay fresh covered at room temperature for up to 1 week. Baked cookies freeze well – up to three months. Unbaked cookie dough balls freeze well – up to three months. Bake frozen cookie dough balls for an extra minute, no need to thaw. Here’s how to freeze cookie dough.
  2. Oats: For these oatmeal raisin cookies, I use old-fashioned whole oats. They provide the ultimate hearty, chewy, thick texture we love!
  3. Eggs: Room temperature eggs preferred. Good rule of thumb: always use room temperature eggs when using room temperature butter.
  4. Raisins: Soak your raisins in warm water for 10 minutes before using (blot very well to dry them) – this makes them nice and plump for your cookies.
  5. Adapted from Loaded Oatmeal Cookies & Oatmeal Creme Pies. Recipe originally published on Sally’s Baking Addiction in 2014.

Keywords: cookies, oatmeal raisin cookies

Soft-Baked Oatmeal Raisin Cookies by sallysbakingaddiction.com. Nothing fancy or complicated, just pure homemade goodness!

738 Comments

  1. I love classic oatmeal cookies, like the ones using the Quaker Oats recipe on the back of the carton. That’s essentially how my grandma, and mom, made their oatmeal raisin cookies and that’s what I love. These look like the beloved cookies from my childhood, Sally! Love them 🙂 Pinned! I can just see how soft & moist they are!

    1. I know you love these Averie… as much as I do. Just plain and simple wholesome oatmeal raisins. Nothing fancy or complicated. Thank you!

  2. I also love raisins, Sally! 🙂 These cookies do look exactly like the ones my grandma used to make, except hers never had nuts…she’d usually throw in either butterscotch chips (my favorite variation!), white-chocolate chips, or even Red Hots. So many great variations!

    1. I have to add butterscotch to my oatmeal raisin cookies next time Caley. You always have the best suggestions. I want to hire you for recipe inspiration. 🙂

      1. How about a trifecta of chips? Butterscotch, white, & chocolate!!! I am not usually a fan of oatmeal raisin cookies, but the fact that your friends said these were your best yet. Definitely trying. Just made yourchocolate chip cookie recipe and inside out cookie recipe. Love me some sallys baking addiction cookies!!!
        Ps I have one dozen of each (cookie dough balls) ready to bake on the fly. Summer entertaining you never know when you may “need” cookies!

  3. Oh, my goodness. I don’t even know you! Raisins instead of chocolate chips? Who are you?!
    Sigh. I guess we can agree to disagree on this one. The cookies still look great! I love the bit of molasses!

    1. Mir! I was so nervous to show my raisin love today. But it’s all good… I’m posting a recipe with lots of chocolate tomorrow to make up for it.

  4. I love raisins…I eat them every day..not surrounded by a yummy oatmeal cookie though…these look so good and since they are made with oatmeal they’d be perfect for breakfast!!!

  5. I love raisins too! They are perfect for sweetening things and adding a little something something to your baking. These cookies look amazing, by the way.

      1. I was just about to suggest the warm water! Around Christmas, I’ve also been known to soak my raisins in rum before baking. Hehe… 😉
        Thank you for all of your amazing recipes!

  6. These look so good and chewy! I would probably change the raisins for chocolate chips 🙂 I don’t hate raisins, they just make me feel a little sick, have no clue why! Gorgeous pictures, have you posted any tips of photographing food? Your pictures are always amazing!! 🙂

      1. Thank you for the link! I’ll be sure to check it out in the morning! I love commenting on your blog because you’re always so sweet and quick to answer any questions! I’ve gotten a lot better at food photography in the last year but can’t wait to read some of your tips to make my photos even better!

  7. I will always always always pick an oatmeal raisin cookie over any other. Even if it’s loaded with all kinds of goodies, if there is an oatmeal raisin next door to it, give me a dozen. I also use a lot of brown sugar in my recipe because it really does just make the cookie that much better. I never thought about using molasses though! What a great idea! I’ll have to try that next time!

    1. Thanks Lynn. Sounds like we have the same cookie preferences. Can’t get enough oatmeal raisin cookies. The extra touch of molasses is perfection. You will love it!

  8. These look like they would hit the spot this weekend….I am totally making these. And blueberry scones. And, Sally, I will blame you if I can’t fit into my skirt on Monday. 😉

    For some reason the past few times I’ve made oatmeal cookies I’ve had issues…they just haven’t baked properly. Thought I was using the wrong type of oats but I double checked…could be my sketch flour measuring catching up with me. I’ll weigh it out this time.

    Thanks for another killer recipe! Can’t wait to try them…I know TJ sells a bag of mixed raisins that always look so plump…going to buy those!

    1. Love TJs raisin medley Christine – so perfect for this cookie recipe! And with all this baking this week, I definitely need a couple dates with my treadmill this weekend. Such a wild life I have haha.

    1. Thanks very very much Sarah! It is so hard to make brown oatmeal raisin cookies look pretty. You have no idea how long these shots took me!

  9. Sally – what do you think about adding golden raisins to this recipe? I love golden raisins and was considering adding them in place of the nuts or replacing half of the regular raisins with golden raisins (and omitting the nuts – I’m not a fan of nuts in cookies!).

    What do you think?

  10. I don’t like raisins (a common problem I’m sure) but I love raisinets! Do you think I could add raisinets or chocolate covered raisins in these instead of raisins?

  11. These look so good! I love oatmeal raisin cookies, and I am a total cookie monster. I will be trying these so soon!

  12. I am trying not to comment on blogs anymore until I have tried the recipe and can offer a relevant contribution, but I did want to state that I am glad you posted a “traditional” oatmeal raisin cookie finally! I am in the camp of raisin-haters, and I don’t like most cookies unless they contain chocolate. However, my husband and mom both love oatmeal raisin, a while back I only wanted to use a recipe from your blog and couldn’t find one! So I have always been baking your Raisinet Oatmeal cookie recipe (works just fine) and subbing the Raisinets out with regular raisins. FYI, that recipe is very successful and a hit, and I even nibble the edges around those despicable raisins 🙂

    1. Love those oatmeal raisinet cookies, Anna! And it means so much to me when readers bake my recipes and report back about them. I really appreciate those reviews, so let me know any other recipes you try if you feel like leaving a comment.

  13. I made a very similar cookie (minus the molasses) for my Dad for over 25 years. They were “his” cookie and I rarely made them for anyone else. I haven’t made them since he passed away 2 years ago. Maybe your variation is what I need to get “back in the game” with oatmeal raisin cookies.

  14. The only time raisins are NOT okay are when they act like chocolate chips. If a cookie is labeled as oatmeal raisin… YUM. But if those little shriveled grapes con me into thinking I’m about to bite into chocolate… I get a little bitter. Lol!

    And I definitely am partial to nuts in my baked goods. My mother and I were talking about this last night (ironically) and some baked goods just don’t need nuts in them, but others are definitely okay with the additional crunch!

    Baking debates! ;o)

    1. Haha I love baking debates. Kevin lost his mind when he noticed nuts in some of these cookies. In a bad way. But they’re the best part! And I agree… when you think you’re biting into an oatmeal chocolate chip cookie and all you get is raisins is extremely disappointing!

  15. My mall has these amazing oatmeal raisin cookies and I think your recipe may have the missing ingredient (MOLASSES)! I am trying this ASAP!

  16. I’m so excited to try this one! I LOVE oatmeal raisin cookies!

    One thing I’ve always done with oatmeal raisin cookies (and most baked goods that use raisins) is soak the raisins in hot water for about 5-10 minutes to get them soft and plump. Yum!

  17. I am not a fan of the raisin, in my 57 years I haven’t been able to get over that. However I do like baking with oatmeal. So despite the offending raisins, these cookies look great (I am just visualizing chocolate chips there in place of the raisins)!

  18. Yum!! These look just like my Mom’s recipe. I love the process of making these cookies..especially because I enjoy the dough more than the actual cookie! And I’m with you, the addition of walnuts is a must!!

  19. Unfortunately, I am a raisin hater. Haha. I love the soft-chewy-oatmeal-cookie part of these though! They certainly look like they live up to the title! Love your tips and explanations too. It sounds silly, but I think I am always confused about which oats are best depending on what I’m making. Thanks for clearing that up! 🙂

  20. Sally, I’m with you on the raisins. LOVE them. But I know from my baking for various groups that that is not usually the case. I’ll bet most of them are like my boss and it is more texture than flavor which is why that soak makes a big difference for folks who don’t tend to like them. I saw someone mentioned cloves and you said there wasn’t any in this but I do have a recipe with cloves in it and it is VERY popular. And the funny part is people will like them because of the cloves but not recognize the cloves to argue that is what is different and what they like. Can’t wait to try this one!

1 2 3 17

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

With kitchen-tested quality recipes and step-by-step tutorials, my goal is to give you the confidence to bake and cook from scratch.

Recipes You’ll Love

Archives

Categories

Sally's Baking Challenge

Join the community on the 1st of every month as we tackle a new challenge recipe.

View More

Sally's Cookie Palooza

A tradition since 2013, every December we countdown to Christmas with 10 new cookie recipes in a row!

View More

Sally's Pie Week

The first week of every November is all about Thanksgiving Pies.

View More

My Cookbooks

About Sally

Welcome to my Kitchen!

I’m Sally, a cookbook author, photographer, and blogger. My goal is to give you the confidence and knowledge to cook and bake from scratch while providing quality recipes and plenty of pictures. Grab a cookie, take a seat, and have fun exploring! more about Sally

×