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These white chocolate macadamia nut cookies are soft-baked style with extra chewy centers. Melted butter maintains a delicious buttery flavor while an extra egg yolk adds chewiness. They’re absolutely PACKED with white chocolate and salted macadamia nuts.

white chocolate macadamia nut cookies

Everything Old is New Again!

My website’s archives are filled with over 1,000 recipes. Some of my earlier recipes are total hidden gems, but there are others that I’ve felt needed some work. I’ve been working behind the scenes updating older recipes as I find necessary. Most notable updates: peanut butter cupcakes, monkey bread, and yellow cupcakes.

Today’s white chocolate macadamia nut cookies are part of this project. I craved a thicker cookie with softer, chewier centers and a distinct buttery flavor. There wasn’t much in this recipe that really needed to change, so I just made a couple minor tweaks.

They’re now perfect.

stack of white chocolate macadamia nut cookies

Video Tutorial

These are the BEST White Chocolate Macadamia Nut Cookies

And here’s why:

  • Major chunks– lots of nuts and white chocolate
  • Classic comforting flavors
  • Extra buttery
  • Soft-baked style
  • Chewy centers
  • Slightly crisp edges
  • Easy to freeze
scooping white chocolate macadamia nut cookie dough into balls
white chocolate macadamia nut cookie dough balls on baking sheet

Re-Testing This Recipe

This recipe is a cross between my coconut macadamia nut cookies and my chewy chocolate chip cookies. Like the original recipe first published in 2012, I use melted butter instead of softened butter. I love using melted butter in cookies because it produces an extra buttery flavor as well as a chewier texture. However, it’s not as simple as swapping melted butter for softened butter. (Of course it’s not. It’s BAKING! So particular!)

You see, melted butter– a liquid– creates spread. If there isn’t enough flour to absorb the added liquid, the cookies will spread all over the baking sheet. On the other hand, if there’s excess flour, the cookies will taste dry. Finding the balance between too wet and too dry is a total roll of the dice! Speaking of dry ingredients, I add 1 teaspoon of cornstarch here. This ingredient adds a little extra softness. I don’t add cornstarch when making the coconut macadamia nut cookies because the coconut acts as a really soft dry ingredient, so cornstarch just isn’t necessary there.

The original recipe also used an extra egg yolk. I love this addition! See my chewy chocolate chip cookies if you’re curious about it. Basically, an extra egg yolk = extra richness and extra chew. Both good things. I do the same with these Snickers cookies, too.

Two final changes: I add a little more baking soda for additional volume because the original cookies typically over-spread. I also switch the amounts of sugar. Here we use an equal amount of granulated sugar and brown sugar. In addition to sweetening, brown sugar creates a soft and more flavorful cookie and granulated sugar creates spread. Balancing them helps produce a chewy, yet crispy edge cookie.

white chocolate macadamia nut cookies

Best Macadamia Nuts to Use

I LOVE using salted dry-roasted macadamia nuts in white chocolate macadamia nut cookies. The roasted salty flavor pairs beautifully with the extra sweet white chocolate morsels– you won’t regret it!

white chocolate macadamia nut cookies
3 Cookie Tips to Improve Your Next Batch
  1. Spoon & Level the Flour: The amount of flour makes or breaks a cookie recipe– literally. Spoon and level that flour or, better yet, weigh your flour.
  2. Chill the Cookie Dough: Chilling the cookie dough, especially since we’re using melted butter, is an imperative step in this recipe. The colder the dough, the less the cookies will over-spread into greasy puddles. You’ll have thicker, sturdier, and more solid cookies.
  3. Bake 1 Batch at a Time: You get the best possible results when the oven only concentrates on 1 batch at a time. If you need to bake more than one batch at a time, rotate the baking sheets from the top rack to bottom rack a couple times through the baking process to encourage even browning. And turn the sheets around as well. Ovens have hot spots!
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white chocolate macadamia nut cookies

Super-Chunk White Chocolate Macadamia Nut Cookies

  • Author: Sally
  • Prep Time: 2 hours, 15 minutes
  • Cook Time: 12 minutes
  • Total Time: 2 hours, 30 minutes
  • Yield: 30 cookies 1x
  • Category: Cookies
  • Method: Baking
  • Cuisine: American

Description

These white chocolate macadamia nut cookies are soft-baked style with extra chewy centers. They’re absolutely PACKED with white chocolate morsels and salted macadamia nuts. Chilling the cookie dough is imperative, so set aside at least 2 hours.


Ingredients

Scale
  • 2 cups + 2 Tablespoons (265gall-purpose flour (spoon & leveled)
  • 1 teaspoon cornstarch
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 3/4 cup (1.5 sticks or 170gunsalted butter, melted + slightly cooled
  • 3/4 cup (150g) packed light or dark brown sugar
  • 3/4 cup (150ggranulated sugar
  • 1 large egg + 1 egg yolk, at room temperature
  • 1 and 1/2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract
  • 1 heaping cup (210g) white chocolate chips*
  • 1 cup (120g) roughly chopped macadamia nuts*

Instructions

  1. Whisk the flour, cornstarch, baking soda, and salt together in a large bowl. Set aside.
  2. Whisk the melted butter, brown sugar, granulated sugar, egg, egg yolk, and vanilla extract together until combined. Pour into dry ingredients and mix everything together with a rubber spatula until completely combined. Fold in the white chocolate chips and macadamia nuts. (You can use a mixer for this step if needed.)
  3. Cover and chill the dough in the refrigerator for at least 2 hours and up to 4 days. If chilling for longer than 2 hours, allow to sit at room temperature for at least 20-30 minutes before rolling and baking because the dough will be quite hard.
  4. Preheat oven to 350°F (177°C). Line baking sheets with parchment paper or silicone baking mats. Set aside.
  5. Roll cookie dough into balls, about 1-1.5 Tablespoons of dough per cookie, and arrange 3 inches apart on the baking sheets. Bake for 12-13 minutes or until lightly browned on the sides. The centers will look soft.
  6. Remove from the oven and allow cookies to cool on the baking sheet for 5 minutes before transferring to a wire rack to cool completely.
  7. Cookies stay fresh covered at room temperature for up to 1 week.

Notes

  1. Make Ahead Instructions: You can make the cookie dough and chill it in the refrigerator for up to 4 days. Allow to come to room temperature then continue with step 4. Baked cookies freeze well for up to 3 months. Unbaked cookie dough balls freeze well for up to 3 months. Bake frozen cookie dough balls for an extra minute, no need to thaw. Read my tips and tricks on how to freeze cookie dough.
  2. Special Tools: Silpat Baking Mat | Baking Sheet | Medium Cookie Scoop | Cooling Rack
  3. White Chocolate Chips: I usually use closer to 1 and 1/4 cups white chocolate chips, about 210g. For looks, you can press a few extra chips into the tops of the warm cookies when they come out of the oven.
  4. Macadamia Nuts: I used salted dry-roasted macadamia nuts. You can use unsalted, raw, and/or whichever macadamia nuts you love most. Salted dry-roasted adds incredible flavor though.
  5. Be sure to check out my top 5 cookie baking tips AND these are my 10 must-have cookie baking tools.

Keywords: white chocolate macadamia nut cookies

Reader Questions and Reviews

  1. Great flavor but the texture is absolutely horrible. Reminds me of a shortbread cookie dough before baking. Super crumbly, and I followed the recipe to a T.

  2. These cookies have a rich decadent quality.
    I was proud to offer then to my family and friends.
    They aren’t the kind of cookie you can make on the spur of the moment as specific ingredients and techniques are required.
    I thought they were worth the planning and work.

  3. Best recipe ever for these cookies. My husband eats them so fast.

  4. Texture was extremely difficult to work with and maybe too many nuts and chocolate chips. All in all, they taste fine.

  5. This is just what I was looking for in a white chocolate/macadamia nut cookie-love them! Texture, taste, looks-they turned out perfect!

    1. Hi Annette, you could try these as bars in a 9×13 inch pan. We are unsure of the best bake time.

  6. There were so many nuts and chocolate chips it barely holds togeather, deff not my fav recipe

  7. i like this recipe, but i feel like my cookies never come out the same.
    I adore this recipe, and my cookies always come out nice, but i have baked them 3 separate times, and each time they come out different! first time was a trial attempt and they came out very thick but delicious, second time i made them smaller in size and had like 80 cookies!, third time they came out very golden with a soft crisp and delicious. not sure why they keep coming out different but whatever

    1. Hi Ann! Oil really isn’t a suitable replacement for butter in cookies.

  8. Ok, so I completely screwed up making these cookies lol. Not paying attention, I mixed the brown sugar with the flour . However, determined as I am, I continued on following your directions. I did NOT refrigerate my dough, it was nothing but a bowl of crumbles. Again, though I continued on. Rolling the balls and seeing what I would get….?
    And I am absolutely astounded by the outcome! They came out unbelievably awesome!
    Thick, they did not run thin.
    Fluffy and full bodied!!
    A very soft and slightly chewy goodness!!
    Thank you so much for a wonderful recipe (even though I messed it up lol) !!!

  9. I had the same problem as a couple of you had. I followed the recipe to a T but my cookies came out crumbly. After five minutes like the recipe says, I tried transferring them to a wire rack, they just fell apart…
    Does anyone know why and what to do about it?
    I would appreciate the advice.

    1. Hi Camille! Dry cookies are usually the result of too much flour in the dough. How did you measure the flour? Make sure to spoon and level (instead of scooping) to avoid packing in too much flour into your measuring cups – or use a kitchen scale. You can read more about properly measuring baking ingredients in this post.

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